Judge Roy Moore II – Archive Page

Judge Roy Moore II
Ten Commandments Monument Battle — Archive Page
Judge Roy Moore


Ban Truth – Reap Tyranny
It is a sad day in our country when the moral foundation of our law and the acknowledgment of God has to be hidden from public view to appease a federal judge.” — Alabama’s former Chief Justice Roy Moore

Justice Roy Moore’s 10 Commandments tour Schedule

Judge OKs monument sale
York Daily Record, PA
Hanover is allowed to sell the 15-square-foot plot that surrounds the Ten Commandments monument in Wirt Park to a private nonprofit group, a judge ruled Tuesday. The borough believes the decision nullifies a threatened lawsuit by Americans United for the Separation of Church and State. The group wrote the borough in November 2003 that it would sue if the monument was not moved out of the public park.

Related
Hanover Votes To Sell Land Around 10 Commandments Monument
WGAL Channel.com — April 29, 2004
HANOVER, Pa. — The borough of Hanover Wednesday night approved a measure to sell the land around a controversial monument in order to keep the 10 Commandments monument and not face litigation. The York County borough will sell a 15-foot section of land around the monument to a non-profit group, effectively taking the monument off public property.

Petition: Get ACLU off taxpayer dole
Legal group awarded 1/2 million tax dollars
for ridding courthouse of 10 Commandments

WorldNetDaily.com
A new online petition asks Congress to change a specific civil-rights statute in hopes of preventing the American Civil Liberties Union from collecting attorney fees from taxpayers of local governments the organization takes to court. The effort – spearheaded by Craig McCarthy of CourtZero.org, a site dedicated to stemming judicial activism – seeks to change 42 U.S.C., Section 1988, of the United States Code. The statute now allows judges to award attorney fees to plaintiffs in civil-rights cases brought against local governments, thereby putting the taxpayers on the hook and oftentimes funneling public money to the ACLU. McCarthy wants the law changed so cases involving the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment would not apply.

Touring Commandments make a symbolic stop
Alabama tablet pulls up alongside
contested display outside courthouse

Houston Chronicle
A 5,280-pound Ten Commandments monument removed from an Alabama court building was displayed near a Bible monument at the Harris County Civil Courts Building on Friday to show support of religious symbols on government property. American Veterans In Domestic Defense parked a flatbed truck with the granite Ten Commandments near the Bible display outside the courthouse. “Our egregious judicial decisions are running roughshod over our Christian heritage, and we are tired of it,” said Jim Cabaniss of Houston, the group’s president, who is a retired owner of a company that built laboratories. On Friday, the veteran’s group drove the truck carrying the monument to the civil courts building on Fannin and parked directly in front of the entrance. Barbara Casarez of Spring Branch said, “I wanted to see the wonderful monument and stand with the other Christians.”

Commandments conundrum
Legality of Ten Commandments displays could
cause the next ‘civil religion’ showdown

The Associated Press
Next year, the high court justices will hear arguments and rule on the memorials at the Texas state Capitol and the courthouses in Kentucky’s McCreary and Pulaski counties. Church-state separationists have challenged many similar monuments in court. The Supreme Court, whose own chamber features a carving of Moses holding the Ten Commandments, refused to hear an Indiana case in 2001, but finally decided to end the confusion. Four federal circuit courts have said commandments displays are legal while three have outlawed them as an unconstitutional ”establishment of religion.” State courts also differ.

Liberty Counsel Requests Support for Ten Commandments Case
Christian Post, CA
Mathew D. Staver, president and general counsel of the national public interest firm that will be arguing the Ten Commandments case before the U.S. Supreme Court next February is asking for prayers and financial support to tackle the blockbuster case. In a letter mailed to the constituents of Florida-based Liberty Counsel, Staver estimated the cost of the court battles involving the Ten Commandments to exceed $500,000. Staver will be defending McCreary County in a suit brought by the American Civil Liberties Union of Kentucky. The ACLU argues that framed copies of the Ten Commandments, which hung in McCreary and Pulaski county courthouses, are government endorsements of religion. The courthouses added other historical documents such as the Magna Carta and Declaration of Independence following the suit.

American Veterans Standing For God and Country
Ten Commandments Monument Tour
Veterans wishing to join in this cause may post their comments and offer their assistance at www.StandingforGod.org or by calling American Veterans in Houston at 281-591-4705. To host a rally contact us.

Transcript of Roy Moore’s
Cross Examination Now Online

Read for yourself how Pryor asked Chief Justice Moore 3 times if he would continue to “acknowledge God.” See the proof for yourself that Chief Justice Moore was removed from the bench, not for posting the 10 Commandments, but for acknowledging God. The issue has always been about the public acknowledement of God. Read the transcript.

The National Coalition to
Restore the Constitution

The National Coalition to Restore the Constitution (NCRC) is a nationwide grassroots network of citizens committed to restoring the original meaning and spirit of the Constitution and the biblical principles upon which this nation was founded.

Who Is America’s Sovereign?
Read Howard Phillips’ stirring speech in defense of Justice Roy Moore

As the World Turns?
WORLD Magazine digs itself in, deeper and deeper

At this precise point in history, WORLD Magazine is not on the right side of the battle for freedom in this country. What they describe as a strategic difference is much more — it is a fundamental philosophical capitulation.

The Rule of Law
and Chief Justice Moore’s case

Ohio Judge James DeWeese is fighting his own battle against the ACLU for the Ten Commandments in his courtroom, but here he takes time to explain the legitimacy of Roy Moore’s stand.

Ten Commandments Case
Read the 13-month-long chronicle of Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore’s battle to keep a monument of the Ten Commandments in the state Judicial Building.

In Defense of Justice Roy Moore
Voters elected Roy S. Moore to the office of Chief Justice of the Supreme Court on the promise that he would restore the moral foundations of the law in Alabama.

Foundation for Moral Law
The official web site of the ten commandments defense fund for Judge Roy Moore.

Our American Birthright
A poem composed by Roy Moore, Chief Justice of the Alabama Supreme Court, for the August 16, rally in Defense of the Public Acknowledgement of God.

Judge Roy Moore Biography
Roy S. Moore is a native of Etowah County, Alabama.

When Civil Government
Attacks the Church

Go to Ten Commandments Monument Battle — Front Page


How The Supreme Court Will Decide
The Ten Commandment Cases In 2005

By David W. New, Esq. / The Covenant News
Millions of Americans believe that the U.S. Supreme Court has an unfriendly attitude toward religion and the role of religion in American life. They believe the Court has discriminated against the rights of religious Americans and treated them like second class citizens. The school prayer cases of the 1960’s are just one of many examples that suggest the Supreme Court has been intolerant and unfair.

Next Ten Commandments Battle Brewing
CBS New York, NY
ANDALUSIA, Ala. — Another Alabama judge could be at the center of the next Ten Commandments battle. Covington County Circuit Judge Ashley McCathan (mihk-CA’-thin) wears a robe in court embroidered with the Biblical rules. Former Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore lost his job over a fight to keep a Ten Commandments monument in the Alabama Judicial building. Now Judge McCathan’s decision could bring another court challenge to the southern state.

SC lawmakers push for Ten Commandments law
The Associated Press
COLUMBIA — Two state lawmakers have again filed legislation seeking to display the Ten Commandments in public buildings. The bill by state Sen. Mike Fair, R-Greenville, proposes that the commandments be displayed prominently in the Statehouse alongside historical documents. Rep. Marty Coates, R-Florence, proposes the commandments be allowed on any property belonging to the state and alongside historical documents. Neither lawmaker specified which historical documents.

Residents dismayed over Ten Commandments’ removal from park
WKYT, KY
PROVIDENCE, R.I. — Some residents are dismayed over the removal of a Ten Commandments tablet that had been at Roger Williams Park for four decades. City officials removed the monument with the basic Christian tenets last fall, with no advance announcement. The act surprised some people, such as Raymond Dempsey, who co-hosts a weekly cable television show called “Chapter and Verse.”

Atheists to Rally Against Judge
Andalusia Star-News, AL
Atheists are planning to protest local Circuit Court Judge Ashley McKathan’s “Ten Commandments robe” today, in front of the First Baptist Church in Opp. At noon today (Wednesday), former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore will be in attendance at a Rotarian meeting in the church’s fellowship hall, where he has said he will publicly support McKathan’s robe. Larry Darby, president of the Montgomery-based Atheist Law Center, organized the protest and has called for fellow atheists to join him to voice their non-support. Judge McKathan’s judicial robe, and its golden-yellow King James version of the Decalogue, has sparked national debate and coverage.

Ala. Judge Wears Ten Commandments on Robe
Covenant News Wire Service
MONTGOMERY, Ala. — A south Alabama judge refused to delay a trial yesterday when an attorney objected to the judge’s wearing a judicial robe with the Ten Commandments embroidered in gold on the front of the garment. Circuit Judge Ashley McKathan showed up on Dec. 13 at his Covington County courtroom in Andalusia wearing the robe at the start of a week of jury trials of cases that were being appealed from lower courts.

Thomas More Law Center Files Supreme Court
Brief in Support of Ten Commandments Display

Covenant News Wire Service
The Supreme Court’s acceptance of a case dealing with the public display of the Ten Commandments is long overdue. The high court’s decision in this case could determine how courts will analyze future disputes over the display of other religious symbols on public property, such as nativity scenes and Christian crosses.

Roy Moore files brief in Ten Commandments case
Former Alabama justice files brief in Ten Commandments case
The Sierra Times
Former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore has weighed in on a Ten Commandments case before the U.S. Supreme Court, urging the justices in a legal brief to acknowledge God as the source of all laws. Justices are expected to hear arguments early next year from two Kentucky counties that contend they should be able to display the Ten Commandments in their courthouses as a way to educate the public about history and celebrate the country’s heritage.

Jury Finds 11 Christians Guilty
11 convicted of obstructing
police in removal of Commandments

Eleven protesters who knelt and prayed around a Ten Commandments monument in Idaho were convicted yesterday of obstructing and delaying the police in the removal of the item from a public park. The Christian demonstrators were arrested March 29 as they prayed at the monument, which was donated to the city of Boise in 1965.

High court tackles crucial Commandments case
Supremes receiving full briefing
on issue for 1st time in history

WorldNetDaily.com
In a case that could change how courts address religion’s role in public institutions, two public-interest groups filed briefs asking the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn a ruling that declared a Ten Commandments display in Kentucky unconstitutional.

American Legion fights to preserve
Ten Commandments in U.S. Supreme Court

Covenant News Wire Service
The American Legion filed a brief today in the U.S. Supreme Court case, McCreary County v. ACLU, which will determine the public display of the Ten Commandments in a Kentucky courthouse. The American Legion is a patriotic, war-time veteran’s organization consisting of approximately 2.7 million members in nearly 14,000 American Legion Posts worldwide, including Puerto Rico, France, Mexico and the Philippines. The Legion urged the court to protect the public displays of religious imagery and preserve our nation’s veterans’ memorials.

Ten Commandments Monument Makes Its Way To Nacogdoches
KTRE, TX
Many who came to witness the monument at Saturday’s rally were upset about it’s removal last year. Johnny Dammon, pastor at Fredonia Hill Baptist Church said, “I felt that it was inappropriate [to remove the monument]. The Ten Commandments has been part of our society and our culture and our bedrock of belief throughout history.” Steve King, a monument visitor said, “It’s just another breach of religious liberty. The whole foundation of our country is based on the Ten Commandments and the laws of the Bible.”

A Monumental Visit
News Journal, TX
Spring Hill Independent School District became a part of living history Tuesday morning when the Ten Commandments monument rolled into the high school parking lot on a flat-bed trailer. The Longview school was the 74th stop for the monument that has made a trek throughout the country in the past few months as part of the American Veterans Faith and Freedom National Tour.

Controversial Ten Commandments Monument In East Texas
KLTV, TX
It was one year ago, almost to the day, that the Ten Commandments monument was removed from an Alabama courthouse. For months the monument was put away, until a group of Veterans began touring with it across the country. Today it made a stop in Longview for some students. “Honor thou father and mother. Thou shall not kill. Thou shall not commit adultery. Thou shall not steal,” a Spring Hill student reads the commandments.

Ten Commandments monument tour visits Bossier City
Shreveport Times, LA
Christian Montessori Academy teacher Kelly Christman brought her class of seventh- and eighth-graders to First Baptist Bossier for “a historic event” Monday afternoon. After being ousted from an Alabama courthouse last year, a two and a half-ton granite replica of the Ten Commandments made its 73rd stop on a 15-state tour.

Chief Justice Roy Moore Speaks to First Coast Congregation
First Coast News
JACKSONVILLE, FL — Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore gave his testimony to the Westside Baptist Church congregation on Sunday morning. Moore was removed from the Alabama court system after refusing to remove a monument from his courthouse listing the Ten Commandments. The monument was removed from the Alabama Judicial Building on August 27, 2003.

Chief Justice Roy Moore urges lawmakers and citizens
to support the Constitutional Restoration Act of 2004

First Coast News
JACKSONVILLE, FL — Asked about his thoughts on the role of political correctness and the ACLU, Moore said they create a dangerous precedent to the foundations of our freedoms. “Very dangerous trends when you have the ACLU saying they’re standing for civil liberties when they’re taking the very author of those liberties away. Our Constitution and our Declaration (of Independence)were not founded on the precept that man gives us our rights. It’s that God gives us out rights,” said Moore. And he urges lawmakers and citizens alike to support the Constitutional Restoration Act of 2004. “Which says, when a State of Federal official acknowledges God, the Federal courts have no jurisdiction to interfere with that. It’s prohibited by the First Ammendment, by the Tenth Ammendment and certainly by the Constitutions of every state, which are the rule of laws,” said Moore.

Old South causes win support in Ala.
Justice linked to pro-Confederates

By Jay Reeves / The Associated Press
MONTGOMERY, ALA. — Old times are not forgotten in the heart of Dixie. Alabama voters elected a Supreme Court candidate linked to Old South ideals and apparently killed a move to strike segregationist language from the state Constitution, a victory of sorts for the state’s neo-Confederate crowd. Michael Hill, president of the pro-secession League of the South, said Tom Parker’s election Tuesday and the Amendment Two results make it obvious that many Alabama voters still identify with Southern causes.

Election Fuels Speculation On Roy Moore’s Future
NBC13.com, AL
MONTGOMERY, Ala. — He wasn’t on Tuesday’s ballot, but ousted Chief Justice Roy Moore’s influence on two contests is fueling speculation about his effort to make a political comeback in 2006. Moore backed Tom Parker, a former associate who won a seat on the state Supreme Court, and he was the first politician to speak out against a proposal to remove segregation-era language from Alabama’s constitution. With only a few precincts to count, Amendment 2 appears to be going down to defeat.

Hartwell city council votes against Ten Commandments display
AccessNorthGA
HARTWELL, Ga. — While its county courthouse shows off a framed copy of the Ten Commandments, the city of Hartwell is shying away from its own display. City Manager Phil Hertz had ordered the police chief to remove the wall hanging at the department Oct. 15, citing the city charter which bans the use of public property for personal reasons unless approved by the city council. The display, purchased by the officers, initially went up in February. Last week, the council finalized the decision by voting 3-2 against the Ten Commandments posting.

Scouts schedule Commandments Hike
The Huntington Herald-Dispatch
HUNTINGTON — The Tri-State Area Council, Boy Scouts of America, has combined concerns for fitness and faith by scheduling its Ten Commandments Hike on Saturday, Nov. 6. The hike — which is open to the public, religious youth groups, Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts — will begin with check-in at Fifth Avenue Baptist Church, 1135 5th Ave., at 8:30 a.m. and will continue until 3 p.m.

America’s religious heritage vanishing
The Spectrum
The religious traditions that have played such a crucial role in developing our American heritage are under attack. They are being marginalized or completely erased. It’s sad to see so many stand by complacently watching America’s religious overtones vanish. Or even worse, to see the many who actually begin to believe that our society really is better off without any mention of God, because he has become so offensive.

Pastors, Join the Black Regiment!
by David Alan Black
Why does it seem that Americans are the only people on earth who are blind to the truth and ignorant of their history? Wherever you look, we can see the vision of freedom that once deluged our shores being swept away. We have to wonder how much longer our American Republic can survive.

City manager Phil Hertz pulls down
Commandments plaque from station wall

The Hartwell Sun
The removal of the plaque from the Hartwell City Police Department comes in the midst of recent national controversy on the issue, fueled locally by the Hart County Commissioners’ decision Oct. 12 to allow citizen Robert Wesley to post the commandments in the county courthouse. Mayor Matt Beasley said Wednesday that he “fully supports Phil Hertz’s decision as city manager.”

No Ten Commandments in Hartwell Police Department
WNEG, GA
A copy of the Ten Commandments is no longer posted in the Hartwell Police Department. The copy was up for more than six months. But when the city manager found out, he ordered it taken down. City Manager Phil Hertz says the police department posted a copy of the Ten Commandments in an office hallway more than six months ago. They paid for it with their own personal money and hung it on a wall. But today, that part of the wall is empty after the city manager ordered the police department to take the Ten Commandments down. “I think if you’re going to take an issue like this and you’re going to post it, then I should have at least have been given the courtesy to say no. It would have been no at that time, no today. Until the council changes that, it will be no,” says Hertz.

Barrow won’t spend more tax money in fight
Gwinnett Daily Post
WINDER — Barrow County will no longer spend taxpayer money to fight its more than yearlong legal battle over displaying the Ten Commandments. In a 4-3 decision Tuesday night, the commission essentially turned to the Rev. Jody Hice and his group Ten Commandments-Georgia Inc. to raise money to fight the American Civil Liberties Union. The ACLU has sued to keep a Commandments poster from hanging in the courthouse, saying the marker represents government-endorsed religion.

Ten Commandments: Religious message or civics lesson?
Provo Daily Herald, UT
Like a secular Moses descending from the mountaintop, the U.S. Supreme Court appears finally ready to lay down the law on government displays of the Ten Commandments. After 24 years of silence, the high court announced on Oct.12 that it would hear not just one, but two cases dealing with the Ten Commandments: Van Orden v. Perry from Texas and McCreary County v. ACLU from Kentucky.

Bush’s shame!
President Bush Guilty Of Moral Cowardice
For Not Defending Roy Moore In His
Courageous 10 Commandments Fight

When Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy S. Moore defied an illegal Federal court order — and fought courageously to defend that 10 Commandments monument — Christians all across America supported him. But, President Bush, who says he’s a Christian, did and said, nothing!

ACLU demands Clay pull Commandments
Charleston Gazette
A state group has demanded Clay County commissioners remove a plaque of the Ten Commandments from their chamber or face legal action. Terri Baur, staff attorney for the American Civil Liberties Union of West Virginia, sent commissioners a letter on behalf of a Clay County resident. Several other people have also complained about the display, said Andrew Schneider, state ACLU director. “The complainant is a non-Christian who feels unwelcome in a governmental environment that endorses a particular religion and who is offended that the County has chosen to single out and sanction any religion,” Baur wrote.

Nicholas County Leaders Vote to Post Ten Commandments
WKYT TV-27 News
The ten commandments will go up in the Nicholas County courthouse. Members of the fiscal court voted 6 to 0 to display the commandments, along with other historical documents. Earlier this month the U.S. Supreme Court said they would take up the issue of posting the ten commandments in public buildings. Two of the cases the high court will hear are from Kentucky, one in Pulaski county, the other McCreary County. The justices will hear the cases in February. A decision will be made in June. Nicholas County leaders say they are prepared to remove the commandments if the Supreme Court rules against them.

Commandments heading to court
Deseret News
Justices to hear 2 cases in 2005 on display of tablets
Some 25 years after ruling that the Ten Commandments have no place in public-school classrooms, the U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to extend its analysis to other types of government property. The high court on Tuesday agreed to hear two cases challenging the constitutionality of Ten Commandments displays in Kentucky courthouses and on the grounds of the Texas State Capitol building.

Monument will Return to Courthouse
NBC 25 TV-News
CUMBERLAND, MD — Less than a week after the Ten Commandments were moved from the Allegany County Courthouse, they’re being moved back. “You could`ve knocked me over with a feather. We were intending to fight this issue for months if not years,” said Ed Taylor, who is against the monument`s move. County administrator Vance Ishler, who made the original decision to move the Commandments, has made the call to move them back.

Monroe County Ten Commandments case maybe delayed
The Monroe County Advocate
The Monroe County government is in the middle of its own battle against the American Civil Liberties over a Ten Commandments display. The ACLU earlier this year sued Monroe County of behalf of Knoxville attorney Kelly O. Herston, who says he is offended by the Ten Commandments display that for now still hangs outside County Mayor Allan Watson’s first-floor office in the courthouse. [But] soon after he learned of the Supreme Court’s decision to hear the Kentucky and Texas cases, Watson said he thinks it would be wise for the county’s case, currently in federal court, to be delayed until the Supreme Court renders its decision or decisions next year. One of the attorneys representing the county in it’s fight against the ACLU, Francis Manion from the American Center for Law and Justice, said Wednesday he has not made a final decision on whether or not delaying Monroe County’s case is the way to go.

Justice Roy Moore speaks in Greenwood
WTHR TV-News
Greenwood — The Alabama judge who refused to move a Ten Commandments monument from his courthouse spoke in Greenwood Wednesday night. Those gathered gave a standing ovation for Roy Moore, the man who was once the Chief Justice of Alabama’s Supreme Court. “It tells me that the people of this country understand better the First Amendment than the judges and justices that sit in judgment thereof,” he said. Pastor Greg Dixon and his Indianapolis Baptist Temple sponsored Wednesday night’s event in Greenwood. That monument drew thousands of visitors here in Greenwood this past week. It heads to Columbus Ohio on Thursday.

Ten Commandments Battle
CBS TV-47 News
“The United States Supreme Court says it will now consider whether the Ten Commandments may be displayed on government property….which ends a 25-year silence on a church-state issue that has led to bitter legal battles around the country.

Earlier this year…the Supreme Court avoided having to rule on the constitutionality of saying “under God” in the Pledge of Allegiance…by throwing it out of court on a technicality.

But now…the nation’s highest court has decided to decide…once and for all…a church and state issue that could tell us a lot about where our country is headed.

Now….in a country that was started by men of faith, and with founding documents that acknowledge the role of God in the creation of human beings and the United States, and with our national motto being “In God We Trust”….it’s hard to imagine the Supreme Court ruling against the Ten Commandments in public places.

Hart County Georgia OKs Ten Commandments
The Hartwell Sun
The Ten Commandments will be posted in a prominent place in the Hart County courthouse, commissioners decided in a unanimous vote Tuesday. After more than two hours of discussion and two separate motions concerning the issue, the board agreed to accept the gift of a Ten Commandments plaque from Robert Wesley and place it next to the mission statement in the county courthouse. County citizens, board members from Ten Commandments-Georgia and Hart County and Robert Wesley, the county citizen presenting the plaque, challenged the board to take a stand on the posting of the Commandments. Saying the cause of the Ten Commandments is “the right cause at the right place at the right time,” Mike Griffin, of both the Hart County and Georgia Ten Commandments group, urged the commission to take a stand by voting for the posting.

Supreme Court jumps into issue
of Ten Commandments displays

The Associated Press
The Supreme Court said Tuesday it will take up the constitutionality of Ten Commandments displays on government land and buildings, a surprise announcement that puts justices in the middle of a politically sensitive issue. Justices have repeatedly refused to revisit issues raised by their 1980 decision that banned the posting of copies of the Ten Commandments in public school classrooms.

Residents happy Supreme Court
to hear Ten Commandments case

Kentucky.com
HARLAN, Ky. — Some officials in conservative southeastern Kentucky towns celebrated as word spread that the U.S. Supreme Court would take up the constitutionality of Ten Commandments displays on government land and buildings. In McCreary County, former Judge-Executive Jimmie Greene heard the news from a local Christian radio station. “The Lord answers prayers,” he said. “We’re elated.” Justices have repeatedly refused to revisit issues raised by their 1980 decision that banned the posting of copies of the Ten Commandments in public school classrooms. In the meantime, lower courts have reached a hodgepodge of conflicting rulings that allow displays in some instances but not in others. The high court will hear appeals early next year involving displays in Kentucky and Texas.

Restore the Ten Tour – Alabama’s
Ten Commandments Visits Columbus

MarkHarringtonlive.com
Columbus, OH — Reform America, an Ohio based Christian organization, announces the Restore the Ten Tour in Columbus, OH Oct. 15-17, 2004 featuring Alabama’s controversial Ten Commandments monument. Affectionately known as “Roy’s Rock” the 5000 pound granite monument caused a national controversy over church-state separation when then Chief Justice Roy Moore refused a court order to remove the decalogue from the Alabama Supreme Court building in Montgomery, AL in 2003. Since that time the monument has been on the road touring the United States. The Columbus visit represents one of dozens of stops the monument has made since the beginning of 2004.

Moore fans rip decrees
Montgomery Advertiser
The turnout was small, but enthusiastic Saturday morning as supporters of ousted Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore gathered to honor him and once again voice their support for the Ten Commandments. The Rev. Kenneth Garner of the Rigby Street Baptist Church, one of the early arrivals for the “Spirit of Montgomery” rally, said he believes the Commandments are “the foundation for western law.” “If you take away the Ten Commandments, you take away America’s authority to govern,” said Garner.

Judge strikes Ten Commandments vote
State judge says citizens of Boise, Idaho cannot place
Ten Commandments initiative on their own city ballot

IdahoStatesman.com
Fourth District Judge Ronald Wilper ruled Wednesday the city of Boise cannot hold an election on the Ten Commandments monument voter initiative. Leaders of the Keep the Commandments Coalition, a group formed in support of putting the monument on public property, said they will appeal the decision to the Idaho Supreme Court. “This is a very important issue when close to 19,000 citizens of Boise signed the petition (to hold an election on the initiative),” coalition spokeswoman Brandi Swindell said. Before the group even had the required number of signatures, Mayor Dave Bieter said he would follow city legal advice that the initiative was invalid. City attorneys said city code limits initiatives to creating ordinances or laws. Putting a monument in a park is an administrative decision that is not up to voters. The judge agreed.

Federal court decides on Allegheny
County courthouse plaque can stay

Ten Commandments has been on wall for 86 years
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
A plaque of the Ten Commandments that has hung for 86 years on a wall outside the Allegheny County Courthouse can remain in place, a federal appeals court ruled yesterday. The 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Philadelphia said the plaque doesn’t violate the constitutional separation of church and state. Its decision upholds a district judge’s ruling in July 2003, which found the plaque didn’t endorse any religion.

Federal judge to rule in Everett Ten Commandments case
Seattle Post Intelligencer
Jesse Card, a 21-year-old Everett resident, sued the city over the monument last year, aided by the Americans United for Separation of Church and State (AUSCS), a Washington, D.C.-based organization that is seeking the removal of publicly displayed Ten Commandment markers in other states. The 6-foot-tall granite slab inscribed with the Ten Commandments and displayed in front of Everett’s police headquarters, partially obscured by trees, was donated to the city in 1959 by the Everett Eagles as part of a national program by the Ohio-based Fraternal Order of Eagles. AUSCS lawyer Benjamin Block said the historical mention of a deity in government — the inscription of “In God We Trust” on currency, for instance — was much different from the monument, which gave a clear command: ” ‘Thou shalt have no other Gods before me’ and other texts.”

Bible’s momentous journey documented
South Bend Tribune, IN
ELKHART — With the goal of illuminating the Christian foundation of the United States, the exhibit “The Dead Sea Scrolls to the Bible in America” has opened at Concord Mall. The exhibit includes some of the 2,250-year-old fragments of the Dead Sea Scrolls, ancient Hebrew examples of the earliest known witnesses to the Hebrew Bible. It also displays early copies of the Bible in Latin and Greek. The exhibit brings the viewer into the modern age with a collection of contemporary Bibles, including one that went to the moon. To further illustrate the ongoing struggle to acknowledge the Christian roots of the United States, Steven Hite said, the display this week hosted the 5,300-pound Ten Commandments tablets that were removed by federal court order in 2003 from the Montgomery courtroom of Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore.

Supreme Court refuses to hear Justice Moore’s appeal
High court rejects appeal of judge’s case
The Associated Press
MONTGOMERY, Ala. — The three-year legal battle over ousted Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore and his Ten Commandments monument ended quietly Monday when the U.S. Supreme Court rejected Moore’s final appeal. The high court made no comment in declining Moore’s request to reverse his expulsion last year by a state judicial ethics panel for refusing a federal judge’s order to remove the 5,300-pound monument from the Alabama courthouse. Moore said in a statement that it was hypocritical for the “liberal Supreme Court” to turn down his appeal even though the justices begin each session with the phrase, “God save the United States and this honorable court.” “Obviously, when they open their courts this way the majority of the court doesn’t really mean it,” said Moore, whose appeal to keep the monument in the courthouse was rejected by the court last year.

Roy S. Moore v. Judicial Inquiry Commission Of The State Of Alabama
Foundation for Moral Law__(pdf format)

At Issue:

    1. Whether, under the Free Exercise Clause of the First Amendment as applied to the States, the Alabama Court of the Judiciary required an unconstitutional religious test as a qualification to public office when it removed Alabama Chief Justice Roy S. Moore from office because he refused to obey a federal court order—and unrepentantly would continue to refuse any similar court order—prohibiting him from freely acknowledging God as the moral foundation of law.

    2. Whether the Alabama Court of the Judiciary, in a proceeding charging Chief Justice Roy S. Moore with breaching the Canons of Judicial Ethics, denied the Chief Justice his property without due process of law under the Fourteenth Amendment, by refusing to hear his defense that the underlying court order, which prohibited him from acknowledging God as the moral foundation of law, was unlawful and unethical.

Justice Moore vows battle not over
Montgomery Advertiser
Chief Justice Roy Moore saw his last chance to regain his post fade away when the U.S. Supreme Court decided Monday not to hear his appeal. For almost a year, Moore and his legal team contended that he was unconstitutionally removed from office by a specially formed judicial body. The nine-member panel ruled that Moore was guilty of willfully defying a court order to remove the 2-ton Ten Commandments monument from the rotunda of the Alabama Judicial Building. In a statement released Monday, Moore said he was not surprised that the “liberal” U.S. Supreme Court “would ignore” the fact he was removed from office because “he acknowledged who God is. “God is sovereign and shall remain so despite what the Supreme Court and federal district courts of this land say,” Moore said. “I have kept my oath and my promise to the people of the state of Alabama. I’ve obeyed the rule of law by not following the unlawful dictates of man.” “The battle to uphold the Constitution is not over, and I will continue to fight to preserve our inalienable right to acknowledge the sovereignty of God,” he said.

October Nationwide Ten Commandments Rallies
Southern Party of Georgia
These rallies will feature the famous Ten Commandments Monument taken from the Alabama Supreme Court Building. This monument was the center of the legal fight when Judge Roy Moore was sued by the ACLU as he was courageously defending our faith. Come and view the Monument and join the rallies.

Commandments Ballot Initiative Goes to Court
Keep The Commandments Coalition Argues Against City In Court
KBCI, ID
BOISE — The Keep The Commandments Coalition took on the city in court Friday in an attempt to get a voter initiative on the ballot. The coalition wants a new Ten Commandments Monument placed in Julia Davis Park. They argued the decision to remove the original monument was not an executive act of the city, but an act of the city council. The city attorney argued the monument was moved because of an administrative act given to the city by state code. The judge in the case is expected to issue a written decision sometime next week. But before the proceedings began the judge said if he does rule in favor of the coalition, it is already too late to get a voter initiative on the November ballot.

Birmingham Police Wear Controversial Pin
Pin Serves As Memorial For Fallen Officers
NBC13.com, AL
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — Birmingham police officers are wearing a new pin to show their commitment to law enforcement and also to support the families of the victims of three slain officers, who lost their lives earlier this summer. The pins were issued shortly after the three officers — Charles Bennett, Harley Chisholm and Carlos Owen — were killed while trying to serve a warrant on June 17. Officers continue to show their support and pay their respects by wearing a Ten Commandments pin. “A gentleman donated the pins to us, and Chief Nunn gave officers permission to wear the pins, and it signifies one of the commandments — ‘Thou shall not kill’ — in remembrance of the officers,” said Lt. Henry Irby.

Court may tackle Commandments public display issue
The Jewish Journal
The U.S. Supreme Court may tackle questions regarding the legal rights of religious prisoners this session, as well as whether the public display of the Ten Commandments violates the separation of church and state. In what may be the last year of the current makeup of the court, legal experts at several American Jewish organizations are expecting the court to again debate the balance between allowing free expression of religion and preventing governmental establishment of religion. The court will likely not announce its schedule for the year until next week, when it officially opens on the first Monday in October. The fact that lower courts have had contradictory rulings on religious issues increases the chances that they will be heard by the high court.

Frederick Plans To Fence Off Ten Commandments
WBAL Channel
FREDERICK, Md. — The city of Frederick plans to put a fence between a privately owned Ten Commandments monument and adjacent park land to delineate the property and possibly resolve a lawsuit, a city official said Wednesday. The city is reviewing suggestions from a downtown historic district committee regarding the design of the barrier, Facilities Manager Pat Keegin said.

Ten Commandments tour in Brunswick
Florida Times-Union
BRUNSWICK — Deposed Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore’s Ten Commandments monument stopped in Brunswick Wednesday on a tour that organizers hope will end with its placement in the nation’s Capitol. About 70 people stood in the noon sun at Brunswick’s Overlook Park to listen to Jim Cabaniss, co-founder of American Veterans in Domestic Defense, as he stood on a flatbed truck with Moore’s granite monument and called for a return to the Ten Commandments as a foundation of America’s moral law.

Commandments Monument Tour Draws Support
The Brunswick News
Moses carried them from Mount Sinai in the Book of Exodus. Alabama carted them out of its Supreme Court building last year. Wednesday, the Ten Commandments reached Brunswick, where city and Glynn County leaders gathered to throw their support behind what rally organizers called the “foundation of our moral law.” About 40 people were at Overlook Park to get a glimpse of the a two-and-a-half-ton carved granite block — the controversial monument that cost Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore his seat on the state’s Supreme Court last November, after he refused court orders to remove the display from the rotunda of the Alabama judicial building.

Judge dismisses lawsuit asking
Moore to pay monument court costs

The Associated Press
MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) – A judge has dismissed a lawsuit demanding that Roy Moore pay the attorneys’ fees for the groups that sued to have his Ten Commandments monument removed from the state judicial building. The state agreed to pay more than $500,000 in fees for attorneys from the American Civil Liberties Union, the Southern Poverty Law Center and Americans United for Separation of Church and State. Those are the groups that won a federal court order to have the 5,300-pound monument moved eventually leading to Moore’s ouster as chief justice. But a group of citizens said Moore used arguments that he knew would lose in his defense of the monument, and that he, NOT taxpayers, should have to foot the bill. Moore praised Montgomery County Circuit Judge Tracy McCooey for dismissing the suit. Moore says there was NO legal basis for the suit.

Farmer Paints Ten Commandments On Barn
NewsNet TV-5
DELLROY, Ohio — Thou shalt not miss this message. That’s what Jay Power hopes will happen after having the Ten Commandments painted on his barn about 500 feet away from state Route 542. Power, 66, a farmer who considers himself a biblical scholar, placed an ad in July for help painting the Ten Commandments on his barn. Five people responded, and he asked the potential painters to submit a design. He chose one submitted by Dave Wagner, of nearby Alliance, and the painting was finished about a week ago. “I’d asked them to make it look like two tablets, and Dave did a fantastic job,” Power said.

Atty. Gen. enters legal battle over Ten Commandments
Lawrence Journal World
Topeka — Kansas Atty. Gen. Phill Kline has entered the legal battle to maintain public displays of the Ten Commandments. Kline joined nine other state attorneys general in a friend-of-the-court legal brief asking the U.S. Supreme Court to uphold the placement of a Ten Commandments monument on the Texas Capitol grounds. The dispute is over whether the 6-foot-high by 3-foot-wide granite monument violates the First Amendment stricture against a government-established religion.

God and the Activist Judges
Human Events
Don’t think that the lawsuits about the Ten Commandments and the Pledge of Allegiance are settled because Judge Roy Moore was fired and Michael Newdow lost his appeal to the Supreme Court. Dozens of similar cases are boiling up all over the country. Since 1999, 24 Ten Commandments cases have been filed, and court confusion is accelerating.

Controversial monument in Humansville for festival
Herald-Free Press
Humansville Fall Festival-goers lined up behind a trailer to get a picture of a controversial stone last weekend. The Ten Commandments monument that was taken out of the Alabama Supreme Court building nearly a year ago was in Humansville last week just in time for the town’s annual festival. The Veterans Faith and Freedom National Tour was not scheduled to be in Missouri until next month, but after hearing of the lawsuit against the Humansville School District and the termination of Superintendent Gregory Thompson, Moore instructed the veterans to be in Humansville for the festival.

Ten Commandments Monument Tour schedule for Toccoa
Southern Party of Georgia
On September 24, at 6:00 PM Judge Roy Moore’s Ten Commandments Monument will be on Display in Toccoa, Georgia. This is part of the national Tour by American Veterans for God. We are very pleased that the Tour will be making this stop in Georgia and hope that as many as possible will plan on attending. There will be a short 90 minute Rally. This is short notice, so please help spread the word.

Ten Commandments in Bibb County update
Southern Party of Georgia
23 year old Ben Davis found “Friends of the Ten Commandments” online. The group believes support for the display of the commandments is written into the US Constitution. Ben Davis, Chairman: “Leave it to the locals that’s how the founding fathers wanted it.” Davis and his group have petitions like this one circulating in local churches. A petition that Davis says has a good shot here because of where he lives.

Fate of Capitol’s Ten Commandments monumnet under review
The Associated Press
HELENA — A state committee plans to decide Wednesday whether a 48-year-old granite monument bearing the Ten Commandments should remain on state property near the Capitol. That and 13 other plaques, statues and monuments scattered around the Capitol grounds will be subject to approval by the Capitol Complex Advisory Council, which will submit its recommendations to the 2005 Legislature.

Paper may print name in Commandments case, judge says
Omaha World-Herald
LINCOLN — A federal judge refused Tuesday to prohibit The World-Herald from publishing the name of a Plattsmouth man who has sued the city over a Ten Commandments monument. U.S. District Judge Richard Kopf directed sharp questions at attorneys for both the ACLU and The World-Herald before deciding not to restrict the newspaper from printing the man’s name. Larry King, executive editor of The World-Herald, said the newspaper has not decided whether, or when, it will identify the man. But that decision, he said, should be left to the newspaper – not the ACLU or the government.

ACLU Fights To Keep Man’s Name Secret
The Associated Press
LINCOLN, Neb. — A federal judge on Tuesday declined a request from the ACLU to stop the Omaha World-Herald from naming an atheist who sued over a Ten Commandments monument displayed in a Plattsmouth park. U.S. District Judge Richard Kopf said there was no proof that putting the restraint on the newspaper was appropriate. Ten Commandments monument has been in the city park for 39 years since 1965.

Commandments going up soon in Henry County
Henry Herald
By placing six historical documents alongside a posting of the Ten Commandments in the county courthouse, Henry County leaders are hoping to avoid a lawsuit. Though no suit has been filed, county commissioners passed a resolution Monday to hang framed copies of the Declaration of Independence, the Bill of Rights, the U.S. Constitution, the Gettysburg Address, the Emancipation Proclamation and the Magna Carta alongside a donated copy of the Ten Commandments.

DeWeese wants Commandments back in his courtroom frame
Mansfield News Journal, OH
MANSFIELD — The battle continues here over a judge’s decision to hang the Ten Commandments in a large, gilded frame on his courtroom wall. Richland County Common Pleas Judge James DeWeese was forced to remove the display after a June 2002 decision by U.S. District Judge Kathleen O’Malley in Cleveland. In July, a three-judge panel of the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth District upheld the ruling 2-1 that displaying the Commandments violates the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment. Attorneys for DeWeese continue to appeal the ruling and have asked the full court to consider the matter. “It’s very difficult to get a rehearing, but we are hopeful because the dissenting opinion was very articulate,” DeWeese said. “They started to recognize some of the free-speech arguments.”

More courts hearing Commandment battles
USA TODAY
Less than a year after a federal judge ordered that a 2 1/2-ton Ten Commandments monument be removed from Alabama’s state courts building, legal battles have sprung up across the nation between civil-liberties groups who are targeting similar monuments and governments that are determined to display them. Two dozen lawsuits — including one heard Wednesday by a federal court in St. Louis — that allege that such monuments amount to an unconstitutional government endorsement of religion are in play in state and federal courts, say lawyers who monitor such cases.

Court hears arguments in Ten Commandments case
Omaha World Herald
ST. LOUIS — A Ten Commandments monument in Plattsmouth is simply a gift from a prominent civic group, not an endorsement of a religious way of life, an attorney representing the town told the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. But a lawyer representing an atheist from Plattsmouth, Neb., argued Wednesday that the 5-foot-tall granite monument is “ample evidence of a Christian purpose.” The full appeals court in St. Louis heard the case after vacating an earlier ruling by a three-judge appeals court panel. The panel had backed the finding of U.S. District Judge Richard Kopf of Lincoln, Neb., that the monument violated the constitutional separation of church and state and “conveys a message that Christianity and Judaism are favored religions.” The appeals court ruling isn’t expected for several weeks.

Ten Commandments monument battle goes before the judge
The Salt Lake Tribune
A white picket fence surrounds natural stones, a few trees and a Ten Commandments monolith. Duchesne City hopes this scene in Roy Park – along with a sign saying the small plot in the park is now private property – will end a federal lawsuit filed by the Salt Lake City-based Summum religion. But Summum founder Corky Ra wants his religion’s “Seven Aphorisms” monument to reside within the park, too. If the city can sell the local Cole family a 10-by-15-foot plot for their Biblical monument, he wants a piece of city land for his.

Most in Ala. favor Ten Comm. displays
BP News, TN
NASHVILLE, Tenn. — A majority of people in Alabama strongly support the public display of monuments to the Ten Commandments, a new poll has found. An “Ask Alabama” poll conducted by Auburn University’s Center for Governmental Services found that 54 percent “strongly support” the display of monuments to the Ten Commandments in public or government buildings. Fifteen percent said they “mildly support” such displays, and just 19 percent either strongly or mildly oppose them.

`Ten Commandments’ Judge Tells Congress to Curb Judicial Power
Religion News Service
Washington — Roy Moore, the former Alabama chief justice known for his public display of the Ten Commandments, made his case Monday (Sept. 13) for a law that would forbid federal judges from ruling on cases about government displays of religion. Moore spoke to a House subcommittee and was backed by Reps. Spencer Bachus and Robert Aderholt, both Republicans from Alabama. It was the second congressional hearing on the subject since June, but supporters said Monday that although they’ve asked, no votes are scheduled.

Commissioners pass on Ten Commandments resolution
Washington Daily News, NC
A fiery war of religious words ignited passions Monday night during the Beaufort County commissioners’ regular monthly meeting, as talk of Muslims, Christians, atheists, elections and the Ten Commandments stole a substantial chunk of public time from business items. Reading from a prepared statement, Cayton said, “While our founders provided for freedom to practice religion, they never intended to trust their dearest rights to someone who had no religion at all, or to someone whose religion was different than their own. They knew that it would be highly unlikely to end up with a collection of infidels in office unless the electorate themselves became infidels.” Amid discussion of the issue, Republican Commissioner Hood Richardson made a motion to approve the resolution. His motion did not win a second, however, and, therefore, “died.” Richardson exhorted the other commissioners to vote for the resolution and teased the board’s three Democratic ministers, David Moore, Jerry Langley and Robert Cayton. “We have three ministers on this board. Let’s see how strong your faith is,” he said, scoring applause from his supporters attending Monday’s session.

Judge Roy Moore appears before Congress
White House Shows No Support For Justice Roy Moore or the Constitution Restoration Act
The Decatur Daily, AL
WASHINGTON (AP) — Ousted Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore contends judges have overstepped their authority in religious expression cases, but his bid to reverse the trend continues to move slowly at best, despite his personal pleas to Congress. Making his second appearance before Congress in three months, Moore on Monday defended the Constitution Restoration Act, which he helped write, before a House Judiciary Committee panel on courts, the Internet and intellectual property. With a divided Congress and no indication of support from the White House, it’s unclear how soon — if ever — lawmakers could act on his plan. There is virtually no chance of passage this year with a crowded legislative calendar and only weeks to go in the session. Moore says judges have no right to make laws abridging an acknowledgment of God.

In an interview with The Associated Press earlier Monday (Scroll down to bottom of page), Moore said he was disappointed the Republican Party didn’t include stronger language on the acknowledgment of God in drafting its platform at the national convention earlier this month (Read: GOP the Godless party). Despite this and a mixed reception from lawmakers, he said he senses the movement is gaining steam. “I think it’s moving on its own,” Moore said. “Nobody else is pushing this. The reason it does have momentum is simply because it’s truth, and people are starting to wake up to the truth.”

Educator in school, religion dispute ousted
News-Leader.com
Humansville — Greg Thompson said a short prayer Wednesday night, and then told reporters his seven-year tenure as Humansville’s superintendent of schools is officially over. Thompson said his termination was finalized during a closed session called by the school board to discuss personnel matters and legal issues, namely a federal lawsuit challenging Thompson’s decision to display a plaque with the Ten Commandments on a school wall. Shortly before 7 p.m. Wednesday, the board voted to go into executive session and district attorney Jay Kirksey escorted reporters to the parking lot outside Humansville High School. When he walked out of the school about 20 minutes later, Thompson said he’s holding firm to his Christian beliefs and won’t be signing a settlement agreement awarding plaintiff Carrie Roat $45,000. “I don’t believe anyone deserves a penny for something like that,” said Thompson, who was suspended by the board without pay in August.

Several Rally Around Ten Commandments Monument
NBC13.com, AL
Christians Want Return To Fundamental Beliefs
LAKE CHARLES, La. — The controversial monument of the Ten Commandments from Alabama was in Lake Charles, La., Wednesday. School children and members of several Christian churches rallied at Veterans Park where the Ten Commandments monument arrived. The monument is now a symbol for those who want a return to the fundamental beliefs of those who founded our country. Darrell White is a former city judge from Baton Rouge who says the judiciary system has distorted the language of the constitution. “We have forgotten what the constitution actually says and we rely more what lawyers wearing robes say about it,” White said. “We need each one of us to study what the document says.”

Poll: Alabama voters still support Ten Commandments monuments
Times Daily, AL
A new poll shows more than two-thirds of Alabamians support public displays of the Ten Commandments, though almost as many say the issue championed by former Chief Justice Roy Moore has received too much attention. Fifty-four percent of poll respondents said they “strongly support” Ten Commandments displays, while another 15 percent said they “mildly support” such displays. Nineteen percent were opposed to the displays. The poll of 609 voting-age Alabama residents was conducted by telephone in June. It had a margin of error of plus or minus 4 percentage points.

Alabama Chief Justice Joins Georgia Commandments Fight
Columbus Ledger-Enquirer, GA
WINDER, Ga. — Former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore has joined Barrow County officials who are fighting a lawsuit challenging a Ten Commandments plaque in the courthouse. Moore, who was suspended for refusing a federal judge’s order to remove a Commandments monument from the Alabama Judicial Building, spoke Thursday night at a $50-a-plate dinner to raise money to oppose the ACLU lawsuit. “Christians are engaged in a spiritual battle,” Moore told an estimated 400 people. “We do need an army and every one of you are in it.” Moore said the issue is about more than whether the Ten Commandments can be displayed in public buildings. “The question is, can the state acknowledge God?,” he said.

Ten Commandments monument coming to Oklahoma City
NewsOK.com
Metro area residents will have a chance to get a close-up view of the Ten Commandments monument removed earlier this year from the Alabama Judicial Building amid a controversy over separation of church and state. The monument is being displayed nationwide as part of the Veterans Faith and Freedom National Tour organized by a Houston-based group called American Veterans in Domestic Defense. Army veteran Hollis Summers of Maynardville, Tenn., said the monument will be at two metro locations during the Labor Day weekend. Summers, a member of the veterans’ group, said the tour will end in Washington, where its organizers hope to find a place to house it permanently. “If we don’t, we’ll build our own,” he said. Summers said the monument has received positive responses thus far, eliciting various reactions from crowds. “Some people want to get up there and pray with it and take pictures of it,” he said. “Some cry with it. We’ve seen everything except anyone trying to harm it.”

A Ten Commandments Rally to be held in a state near you:

Sept 5,6,7 Oklahoma City, OK
Sept 8 Lake Charles, LA
Sept 9 Denham Springs, LA
Sept 10 Slidell, LA
Sept 11-12 Hattisburg, MS
Sept 25 Spartenburg, SC
Oct 1 West Palm Beach, Fl
Oct 3 Coral Gables, FL
Oct 9 Lakeland, FL
Oct 15-23 Washington D.C. Area

Judge Roy Moore seeks reinstatement
in appeal to U.S. Supreme Court

Christian Examiner
WASHINGTON — Judge Roy Moore has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to reverse an Alabama judicial ruling that removed him as chief justice of the Alabama Supreme Court. The appeal was filed July 29, Moore and his legal team announced at a news conference Aug. 2 in Montgomery. Two key issues are raised in the appeal, according to the Foundation for Moral Law, a Montgomery-based organization defending Moore and seeking to advance his views on constitutional issues.

Moore to Release Book in March on the
True Meaning of Separation of Church

Columbus Ledger-Enquirer
MONTGOMERY, Ala. — Chief Justice Roy Moore said Thursday he will release a book next year explaining why he believes acknowledgments of God by public officials – such as his Ten Commandments monument – are both legal and necessary. The book, titled “So Help Me God!”, is set to be released in March 2005 by Nashville, Tenn.-based Broadman and Holman Publishers. Financial terms of the deal were not released. “It is time that the American people awake to the true meaning of separation of church and state and our unique relationship to God as a nation,” Moore said in a statement.

Chief Justice Roy Moore To Speak At Barrow Fund-Raiser
Gwinnett Daily Post, GA.
WINDER — Almost a year ago, Barrow County embarked on a legal battle with the American Civil Liberties Union over a Ten Commandments poster at the county’s courthouse. Former Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore faced a similar battle. On Aug. 21, 2003, Moore refused to remove a 5,300-pound granite Commandments monument from the rotunda of the Alabama Judicial Building. A day later, he was suspended from office, and in November, he was removed from the bench.

Teacher Quits After Refusing To Remove Commandments
KAAL, MN.
MASON CITY, Iowa — A five-year middle school band teacher in Mason City has resigned after refusing to remove religious items, including a poster of the Ten Commandments, from his classroom. Luke Miller said the poster, as “well as a few other items” of a religious nature were at the center of the discussion between him and district officials. The 35-year-old Miller said he was asked by the school administration to remove the items and he refused. He then resigned on August 20th. Superintendent Keith Sersland would not comment on the situation, except to confirm that Miller “voluntarily resigned.”

Ten Commandments stone tours East Grand Forks
Grand Forks Herald, ND.
The 5,280-pound monument to the Ten Commandments that got Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore knocked off the bench by a federal judge was brought to East Grand Forks on Tuesday in a rally for American values, Christianity and warnings against the judiciary. Mark Skogerboe, a lay Lutheran pastor from New Hope, Minn., who previously lived in East Grand Forks and Karlstad, Minn., is a leader of the group that is hauling the huge granite edifice around the country. “America is in big trouble,” Skogerboe preached from the back of the rented truck to a crowd of about 60 people in Sherlock Park. “Let us repair to the standards the founders gave us, like the Ten Commandments and the Word of God,” said Skogerboe.

Commandments Tours Fargo as Lawsuit Moves Ahead
Bismarck Tribune, ND.
FARGO — A touring monument of the Ten Commandments stopped here Tuesday as lawyers moved ahead with a lawsuit opposing a similar marker outside Fargo’s City Hall. A small group of supporters gathered at the Fargo Civic Center for a rally featuring the 5,280-pound Ten Commandments monument owned by Roy Moore, the former Alabama chief justice ousted for refusing to remove the monument from the state courthouse. “I don’t think people rec-ognize our freedom is under assault,” said the Rev. Mark Skogerboe, of New Hope, Minn., one of the rally’s organizers. “Because the loss of freedom is gradual, one court decision at a time.” Skogerboe, who represents Texas-based Christian group Vision America, said one of the organization’s goals is to make sure Fargo’s Ten Commandments monument stays put.

Fargo’s Ten Commandments case to go forward
Fargo Forum
Fargo’s once-stalled Ten Commandments case is back on track, no longer at the mercy of a similar and ongoing case in Nebraska. U.S. District Judge Ralph Erickson has decided that plaintiffs pushing to have the Fargo Ten Commandments monument removed should not have to wait indefinitely for the Plattsmouth, Neb., case to be settled. Assistant Fargo City Attorney Patty Roscoe said the city — the defendant in the case — hoped the final outcome of the Plattsmouth case could stand as a guide for Fargo. Both cities fall under the jurisdiction of the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. Attorneys from each side in the Fargo suit will talk via phone today to figure out a timeline for the case now that it’s moving forward. Their meeting coincides with the arrival in Fargo of a traveling, 5,280 pound Ten Commandments monument — the same one recently removed amid controversy from the judicial building in Montgomery, Ala. As part of a nationwide tour organized by American Veterans Standing for God and Country, the monument will be carried throughout several states over the next few months for a series of “God Bless America” rallies.

Humansville School Chief Out of a Job
Commandments dispute ends with Greg Thompson turning in his keys.
Greg Thompson, the Humansville superintendent whose Ten Commandments plaque sparked a federal lawsuit and constitutional controversy, says he has cleaned out his office and turned in his key. The small Polk County district’s school board put Thompson on leave with pay Monday, days after he was put on leave without pay because he wouldn’t follow federal law regarding church-state separation. His contract calls for 60 days of leave with pay while he reconsiders, but he says he’ll stick to his convictions.

Moore to appear at Barrow Ten Commandments rally
WINDER – Chief Justice Roy Moore will be in Winder, Georgia next month to help raise money for Barrow County’s defense of a Ten Commandments lawsuit. The rally will be held September 2.

School Official Put On Leave for Posting Commandments
Springfield News Leader
HUMANSVILLE, Mo. — Humansville superintendent Greg Thompson, whose posting of the Ten Commandments on a school wall brought on a highly publicized federal lawsuit, has been put on administrative leave without pay. Thompson’s display of the Ten Commandments has drawn widespread support from the town’s residents — and elicited support from former Alabama Supreme Court Justice Roy Moore, who was ousted from office after a battle over displaying a monument containing the biblical passages. The board, in an Aug. 11 closed meeting, voted 6-1 to place Thompson on administrate leave without pay immediately and remove his authority, according to the documents. Lawyers for the district and plaintiff Carrie Roat have had disagreements over the settlement of the case, which hasn’t been finalized or approved by the judge. The tentative agreement would stipulate that Roat and her son would drop their claims against the district and that, in turn, the district would pay Roat $45,000 and comply with federal law.

School Board Mulls Fate of Humansville superintendent
Greg Thompson won’t agree to not display religious symbols in school.
HUMANSVILLE, Mo. — The Humansville School District superintendent is waiting to see whether he will keep his job. Greg Thompson, who fought to keep the Ten Commandments displayed in his school, is on leave without pay. The school board suspended Thompson in a closed session on Aug. 11 because he wouldn’t agree to abide by court rulings that prohibit the use of religious symbols in schools for non-educational purposes. The board met in another closed session on Monday evening. If it took a vote on Thompson’s employment in that session, the board has 72 hours to announce it. Thompson says the school board is protecting itself after the district settled a lawsuit last month with the mother of a Humansville student over displaying the Ten Commandments plaque in the cafeteria. Carrie Roat received $45,000 and an agreement that the district wouldn’t display religious symbols after she sued the district in federal court in March.

Georgia Judge Wants Historical Display In Courthouse
NorthFulton.com, GA
Superior Court Judge Jeffrey S. Bagley wants to install a courthouse display of historic documents – including the Ten Commandments –he said are used as foundations of law. Bagley, chief judge of the Bell-Forsyth Judicial Circuit, asked for support at the Aug. 9 Board of Commissioners meeting. He said the display would be intended to educate jurors about their role and importance. Ken Jarrard, county staff attorney, said the issue would be covered under U.S. Constitutional law rather than Georgia law, so any precedents set in Alabama would apply to Forsyth County. He said he believed Bagley approached the display correctly, as an historical display, and it should pass Constitutional muster.

Boise’s Ten Commandments Supporters Turn in Signatures
Idaho Statesman
The Keep the Commandments Coalition turned in 18,507 signatures to the Boise city clerk’s office Friday — nearly 10,000 more than needed to put their issue on the ballot. At a City Hall rally before they turned in the petitions, the Rev. Bryan Fischer challenged the City Council to simply enact the initiative without even holding the election. If the council refuses to do that, it should hold the election, the coalition co-chair said. “The Ten Commandments were removed by a legislative act. They can be returned by a legislative act,” said Fischer, backed by coalition members holding signs saying “Let the people vote” and “Mr. Mayor, support democracy.”

City Adopts Policy for Monuments
Daily Herald
Pleasant Grove city officials say a recently adopted policy, which will regulate where monuments and plaques are placed, has nothing to do with a controversial lawsuit that could remove the city’s Ten Commandments monument currently on display in a city park. The new policy regulates where, and if, donated monuments, plaques, displays, permanent signs and structures are placed on city property.

Faithful Flock To See Ala. Ten Commandments
Denver Post
Pueblo – Alice Laverne Gearhart carefully climbed the five steps to the bed of the 18-foot-long truck and stood in awe at a hip-high slab of granite that ignited a firestorm of controversy over the separation of church and state last year. The 5,300-pound stone inscribed with the Ten Commandments, a temporary gift from former Alabama Chief Justice Roy S. Moore, was a rare treat for the 74-year-old Gearhart and some five dozen other Pueblo residents who gathered in a church parking lot to view the monument and openly proclaim their religious beliefs. “We admire his conviction,” Gearhart said. “(Moore) is a brave man to fight the system.” The visitors stood quietly Saturday as they waited to climb on back of the truck and pose for photos next to the monument. Some held their arms towards the heavens during opening prayers. The monument will be on display at the Circle Drive Baptist Church in Colorado Springs from noon until 1 p.m. today. It will be on display at Focus on the Family beginning at 11 a.m. Monday.

Hanover Ready to Act if Court OKs Sale
Evening Sun
If the York County Orphans’ Court rules that Hanover Borough can sell a 15-square-foot parcel of land surrounding the Ten Commandments monument in Wirt Park, borough council will be ready. At Wednesday night’s meeting, council voted to approve final plans for a subdivision, contingent on the court ruling in the borough’s favor. The subdivided area would surround the monument on the side of the park facing High Street. Under the plan, the area would be enclosed by a gate, and trees would be planted on either side of the monument. Also, a brick area in front of the monument would lead from the sidewalk to the monument.

Chief Justice Roy Moore: U.S. was founded on belief
Meridian Star
The judge who attracted nationwide attention last year when he defied a federal order to remove a Ten Commandments monument from his courthouse spoke Wednesday in Meridian. Roy Moore, former chief justice of the Alabama Supreme Court, says it is hypocritical to ban governmental promotion of religion when the U.S. Constitution recognizes God. Moore said prohibiting the acknowledgement of God in a courthouse — or in any house — is a threat to the security of America and its people. “It undermines the very moral basis upon which our society was founded,” Moore said.

Group transporting Ten Commandments statue around U.S.
Mitchell Daily Republic
The Ten Commandments monument placed in front of the Alabama state judicial building created a nationwide stir when it was removed last November by a federal judge’s order. On Wednesday morning, the controversial 2.6-ton granite monument made a brief stop in Mitchell at the I-90 Truck Haven while en route to the Sturgis motorcycle rally. American Veterans in Domestic Defense, a Christian veterans’ organization based in Houston, Texas, is transporting the stone sculpture around the United States as part of a campaign to have the monument permanently displayed in Washington, D.C.

Press Release from: Jim Cabaniss, President of American Veterans Standing For God and Country, a project of American Veterans In Domestic Defense

Most Americans remember the scene at the Alabama State Supreme Court Building on August 27, 2003.

On that day, federal authorities instructed the removal of the 2.5 ton Ten Commandment Monument from the beautiful rotunda to a dark storage closet. This made most Americans angry.

Today we are moving the Monument out of the darkness into the light. The American Veterans Standing For God and Country have reached an agreement with Chief Justice Roy Moore to take possession of this beautiful monument and display it across America from city to city on its way to our Nation’s Capital. Most Veterans have great respect for Chief Justice Moore. He is a Veteran, a West Point Graduate, a great Constitutional and Biblical Scholar.

He stood on his oath, even to the point of giving up his job as the top Judicial Authority in the State of Alabama. We know there must be something wrong in America when an appointed federal judge has the power to tell a duly elected State Supreme Court Judge that he cannot acknowledge God and thus fulfill his oath of office.

Starting July 31, Veterans will support rallies by displaying this Ten Commandment Monument from coast to coast. Those Veterans wishing to join in this cause may post their comments and offer their assistance at www.StandingforGod.org or by calling American Veterans in Houston at 281-591-4705. To host a rally contact us.

Isaiah 33:22 “For the Lord is our judge, the Lord is our lawgiver, the Lord is our King; He will save us.”

Chief Justice Moore Defends His Stand
WTOK TV-11
Former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore joined in the Wednesday night prayer and worship service at Evangel Temple in Meridian. During his visit, Judge Moore also visited WTOK for a taping of its public affairs program, On the Record. The discussion centered on the Ten Commandments monument which he placed in the Alabama judicial building and has since been removed.

Monument barred in Ala. is rolling into Colorado
Denver Post
The 2 1/2-ton Ten Commandments monument, which set off a church-state separation feud last year when Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore tried and failed to keep it in his courthouse rotunda, is on a national tour that will take it to Pueblo, Colorado Springs and metro Denver in the coming days. The Houston group American Veterans in Domestic Defense won Moore’s approval to remove the massive chunk of granite from a closet, where it had been stored after a court ordered its removal.

Alabama Monument in Black Hills
Rapid City Journal
RAPID CITY – The granite Ten Commandments monument that was in the Alabama state judicial building until it was removed by order of a federal judge, will be in Rapid City tonight, Aug. 11, at the Rushmore Plaza Civic Center west parking lot, according to Bob Ellis of Rapid City, a coordinator of the event. An all-night prayer vigil is planned. The monument will be taken to Sturgis on Thursday, Aug. 12.

Touring Ten Commandments spark fervor at Franklin rally
Tennessean
Before stepping onto a flatbed truck to gaze upon a 5,300-pound granite monument of the Ten Commandments, Willia Davis said she believed there was ”spiritual warfare” going on in the country. ”They took this monument out of a courthouse. They’ve taken prayer out of schools, and we can’t even say a blessing in public anymore,” Davis said. ”Even the government is turning against God and taking our rights away from us.”

Chief Justice Roy Moore to speak in Mississippi at Evangel Temple
The Meridian Star
“It’s time we as a nation wake up and see what godly men do,” said the Rev. Mike Boles, pastor of Evangel Temple. “It’s time for us to pray for and support people who are standing up for the things that are right, that are godly.” On Wednesday, August 11, at 7 p.m., Chief Justice Roy Moore will be guest speaker at Evangel Temple. The topic has been left to Moore’s discretion. “We’re hoping he will energize Christian people to find out where politicians stand on issues of importance, and to get out and vote,” he said.

Southern Heritage Group Rallies on Square
Henry Herald
In a show of solidarity for Henry County commissioners’ decision to post a Ten Commandments display in the county courthouse, a southern heritage group held a rally on the town square in McDonough Saturday. The display has not been posted but commissioners resolved to do so last month. Judy and Jerry Leatherman came from Stockbridge to attend the rally. “I want to support the Ten Commandments and make sure everybody knows it’s in the courthouse,” Jerry Leatherman said. “Every county and every citizen needs to support it.” Jerry Leatherman said he is a member of the Sons of Confederate Veterans.

Roy Moore Says He May Run Again
WSFA TV-12
Ousted from office and still after his old job, Roy Moore still has some political fight left in him. On Thursday, he was in Washington D.C. speaking to college students about the first amendment. But first, he appeared live on C-SPAN, and that is where he was asked about his future political plans. Moore said something we haven’t heard since he was removed from office. When asked by the news anchor on C-SPAN, “Are you planning on running again?” Moore said, “Well, if I must. I must.” Moore did not elaborate on that statement. He is currently appealing his removal from office to the United States Supreme Court.

Follow 10 Commandments to Casey Jones
Jackson Sun
Controversial monument’s tour is in Jackson today
A nationally known statue sits atop a rented flat bed truck as it awaits its next move through West Tennessee to make it to Bellevue Baptist Church in Memphis by the 8 a.m. Sunday service. The controversial Ten Commandments Monument has made its way from Montgomery, Ala., to the Casey Jones Village in Jackson, where it will be on display until 1 p.m. today.

Roy Moore Seeks Reinstatement in Appeal to U.S. Supreme Court
WASHINGTON — Judge Roy Moore has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to reverse an Alabama judicial ruling that removed him as chief justice of the Alabama Supreme Court. The appeal was filed July 29, according to Moore and his legal team at a news conference Aug. 2 in Montgomery. Two key issues are raised in the appeal, according to the Foundation for Moral Law, a Montgomery-based organization defending Moore and seeking to advance his views on constitutional issues.

Moore Enters Final Legal Round
Former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore is down to the final round of a heavyweight fight with the court system regarding his removal from office in mid-November of last year. Attorney Phillip L. Jauregui announced today that Moore’s legal team filed a petition Thursday asking the U.S. Supreme Court to consider hearing his appeal. The filing came just before a 90-day time limit ran out. Moore and his attorneys contend that Moore’s removal as chief justice was unconstitutional.

Foundation Asks U.S. Supreme Court to
Reverse Chief Justice Moore’s Removal (Scroll Down)

Foundation for Moral Law

Roy S. Moore v. Judicial Inquiry Commission of the State of Alabama

Chief Justice Roy Moore, who was removed by the Alabama Court of the Judiciary on supposed “ethics” grounds for refusing to stop acknowledging God, has asked the United States Supreme Court to hear his case and reverse the Alabama courts that have kept him out of office.

The petition to the Supreme Court [read it here PDF format] was prepared by attorneys here at the Foundation for Moral Law, Inc., as well as Herb Titus and Phillip Jauregui, two of the attorneys who defended the Ten Commandments monument in federal court. Chief Justice Moore argued in the petition that (1) the Alabama courts violated the First Amendment by forcing Chief Justice Moore to choose between acknowledging God and his elected position, and (2) Chief Justice Moore was denied due process of law under the Fourteenth Amendment because the Alabama courts refused to hear his defense that the federal court order demanding that he remove the Ten Commandments monument was itself unlawful and not ethically binding on him. The Foundation hopes that the Supreme Court hears the case and restores justice to the former Chief Justice.

Ten Commandments Voter Initiative

WASHINGTON — The nation’s first voter initiative on the public display of the Ten Commandments to be held in Boise, Idaho this fall.

Religious rights and freedom advocates call the Boise initiative an exciting and innovative approach in confronting the loss of religious speech and expression in the public square.

Rev. Patrick Mahoney, Director of the Washington, DC-based Christian Defense Coalition states, “The citizens of Boise are giving hope to millions of Americans who have become discouraged by the public loss of religious expression and the tyranny of activist judges. It is my hope that scores of communities across America will follow the example of Boise and hold similar voter initiatives on the Ten Commandments.”

Brandi Swindell, Co-director of the Keep the Commandments Coalition Boise, comments, “We are now taking the debate concerning the public display of the Ten Commandments out of the hands of judges, the courts and politicians and placing it back in the hands of the American people where it belongs.”

Group plans Commandments rally
A group of Southern heritage promoters hopes the town square will fill with proponents of public display of the 10 Commandments for a public rally scheduled for Saturday. The League of the South is planning a rally on the McDonough Square to show county leaders support for their decision to display the controversial poster in the county courthouse, despite some outcry from others in the community.

Ten Commandments’ Tour Visits Franklin Tenn. Wednesday
Review Appeal
Walter Glenn of Fairview is a man with a mission: To see that the Ten Commandments are given public honor by being placed on public land for display both here in Tennessee and all across the country. Glenn is local coordinator for a Ten Commandments’ rally to be held here Wednesday, Aug. 4, first at The Factory in Franklin from 1-3 p.m., and then at Friendship United Methodist Church on Highway 96 West near Freedom Middle School. In fact, the Wednesday rally will feature the monument that started the whole ruckus, the two-and-one-half ton structure that Justice Moore had built at his own expense.

Ten Commandments Tennessee Rally Schedule

Sunday Aug. 1 – Greenville – County Court House, Main Street 3:00-4:30 Broadcase Live at www.crusaderadio.com

Monday Aug 2 Oak Ridge – Oak Ridge Mall 11:30 – 1:00 A.M. EST Aug 2 – Maynardville, behind High School 6:00- 7:30 PM EST

Tuesday Aug. 3 Cookeville – Willow Tree Shopping Center 12 Noon – 1:30 CST

Wednesday Aug. 4 – Franklin 1-5 pm CST 1 – 3 PM The Factory (shopping center), West Main street, speeches inside 3 – 5 PM Franklin Friendship Methodist Church, west on Highway 96

Thursday Aug. 5 – Dover – 1:30 – 3:00 CST Ballfield

Friday Aug 6 – Sommerville (Fayette County) 7:00 – 8:30 PM Warren Community Church

Saturday Aug 7 Savannah 10:00 – 11:30 Piggly Wiggly Parking Lot

Sunday Aug 8 – Memphis – Bellevue Baptist Church – 8:30- 10:00 AM, Adrian Rogers Church Lawton – Clear Creek Baptist Church 1:30-3:00 PM Memphis First Assembly of God 6:00 – 7:30 PM

For Tennessee Rally information call: June Griffin, Tennessee Coordinator at (423) 775-0774. Ten Commandment Rallies are planned nation wide, beginning in Tennessee during the week of July 31 through August 8. For rallies outside of Tennessee, please check updates at www.StandingforGod.org Web site will not be updated again until Tuesday, August 2. If you would like to host a rally, email info@avidd.org.

Henry County Georgia Votes To Display Ten Commandments
Southern Party of Georgia
The Ten Commandments were adopted by the Henry County Board of Commissioners to be publicly displayed in the county courthouse — a gift from the HC League of the South. This was the second Atlanta area county in recent weeks to do so; and, apparently, it is the one that the media has chosen to cover. Henry County is the fourth fastest-growing county in America and one of the larger counties by population in Georgia. The people of Henry County are abuzz about this in their excitement of the Board’s unanimous decision… all the more reason that we should take this issue to EVERY county in Georgia immediately.

Alabama Ten Commandments Monument on Display
Chattanooga Times Free Press
DAYTON, Tenn. — The Ten Commandments monument that cost Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore his job will be on display Saturday as the first stop on a cross-country trek, tour organizers said Tuesday. The 5,300-pound monument, removed from the Alabama Judicial Building, will be on display at the Rhea County Courthouse, home of the 1925 Scopes Trial. It also will visit Rhea County High School and the Sequatchie County Courthouse in Dunlap, Tenn.

Activists Ask Appeals Court to Hear Ten Commandments Case Again
Mansfield News Journal
CINCINNATI — Activists asked a federal appeals court Wednesday to reconsider its ruling forbidding the display of the Ten Commandments in an Ohio judge’s courtroom. The 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled 2-1 on July 14 that the display in the courtroom of Richland County Common Pleas Court Judge James DeWeese violates the Constitution. On Wednesday, the American Center for Law and Justice — an advocacy group representing DeWeese — asked the full appeals court to set aside the ruling and reconsider the case.

Got a bid for the 10 Commandments?
Newsday
Looking for a gift for that hard-to-please someone? How about an original pair of “The Ten Commandments” tablets from the 1956 biblical epic starring Charlton Heston? The tablets, one of four pairs that are believed to have been made for the Cecil B. DeMille classic, will be auctioned live on eBay on Friday as part of a massive Hollywood garage sale. Bids start at $40,000.

Lauren Kennedy to Be Part of Ten Commandments Musical
Playbill
Lauren Kennedy, most recently on Broadway as Fantine in Les Misérables, will be part of the cast of the new musical The Ten Commandments: The Spectacle Musical. Kennedy’s official website says that the actress be among the cast of the musical starring film actor Val Kilmer as Moses. The stagework, presented by BCBGMaxAzria Entertainment (founded by fashion designer Max Azria and Charles Cohen) and 7Art, is set to begin performances at the Kodak Theater in Hollywood, California Sept. 18 and open Sept. 27.

Chief Justice Roy Moore threatened by the GOP
Michael A. Peroutka
A recent Associated Press story by Jay Reeves has reported, accurately, that former Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy S. Moore and I have appeared together at several meetings in different states. In reaction to this fact, in this AP story, Alabama Republican Party Chairman Marty Connors is paraphrased as saying that former Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy S. Moore “could jeopardize his right to run as a Republican in state elections” if he endorses candidates who are not Republicans (such as myself). I am disappointed by Mr. Connors’ narrow-minded, anti-free speech, political intolerance. His threatening of Alabama’s former Supreme Court Chief Justice is blatantly hypocritical since his state party’s “Republican Oath” says, among other things, that “one of those principles worth retaining” is to have “an outlook broad enough to accommodate…varying points of view.”

Ten Commandments Controversy Moves West
Fox News
EVERETT, Wash. — The city of Everett is the new battleground in the debate over the Ten Commandments and where to draw the line in the separation of church and state. A granite monument of the Ten Commandments is tucked among some bushes in front of the Everett Police Station, along with more visible World War I and II memorials standing near the same corner of the building. Despite some recent court rulings that have gone against other similar markers on public property, Everett is fighting the lawsuit, claiming its monument has historical importance. It was donated to the city 45 years ago.

Duluth’s Ten Commandments Monument Moved
KDLH TV 3
Early Thursday the Ten Commandments Monument made their way to an undisclosed storage location outside Duluth. The monument will stay there until Steve Peterson of Save Our Ten Commandments secures a place to display it. He hopes to place it in Canal Park on a small parcel of land across the street from Little Angies Restaurant.

Judge Moore update focus of Eagle Forum
Alamogordo Daily News, NM
The Ten Commandments haven’t gone away for thousands of years. Those who support them aren’t going anywhere, either. Paragon Executive Director GB Oliver III will update Eagle Forum-New Mexico members, on Tuesday, on Ten Commandments Judge Roy Moore. Moore spoke last week at Paragon’s Freedom 21 conference in Reno, Nev. He has also appeared in Alamogordo at an Eagle Forum/Paragon “Sovereignty and Your Rights Seminar.” Moore said America’s traditional “way of life is under attack … from liberals.” God’s law, he said, is “found in the Ten Commandments, and the U.S. Constitution as well as the amendments are words … defined by law, given by God.”

Judge Roy Moore Addresses Conference,
Calls for Protection of Freedom of Religion

Axcess Business News, NV
Reno NV – Judge Roy Moore who defied a federal court ruling and lost his elected position as Chief Justice of Alabama’s Supreme Court, addressed the opening session of the 5th annual Freedom21 Conference being held in Reno, Nevada. The judge remained defiant, saying, “The acknowledgement of God affects everyone” in areas that include “the right to life, property rights, and freedom itself.” The conference has attracted several hundred conservatively oriented individuals and addresses topics that include national sovereignty, the United Nations, property rights, environmentalism, and Second Amendment rights, among others.

Ten Commandments Monument Moved
from Courthouse Storage for Tour

By Kyle Wingfield / The Associated Press
MONTGOMERY, Ala. — A Ten Commandments monument that became a landmark in the debate over religion’s place in government was hauled away from its storage room in the state courthouse Monday, bound for a summer road trip to the nation’s capital. The 5,280-pound marker was brought out of the building by a veterans’ group nearly a year after it was moved from the rotunda. A federal judge had ruled the prominent public display amounted to an unconstitutional promotion of religion by government. It was placed by crane on a flatbed truck and driven away under police escort to an undisclosed location. The truck driver said he was headed north toward Tennessee, where the tour’s first rally will be held July 31 in Dayton.

Press Release from: Jim Cabaniss, President of American Veterans Standing For God and Country, a project of American Veterans In Domestic Defense

Most Americans remember the scene at the Alabama State Supreme Court Building on August 27, 2003.

On that day, federal authorities instructed the removal of the 2.5 ton Ten Commandment Monument from the beautiful rotunda to a dark storage closet. This made most Americans angry.

Today we are moving the Monument out of the darkness into the light. The American Veterans Standing For God and Country have reached an agreement with Chief Justice Roy Moore to take possession of this beautiful monument and display it across America from city to city on its way to our Nation’s Capital. Most Veterans have great respect for Chief Justice Moore. He is a Veteran, a West Point Graduate, a great Constitutional and Biblical Scholar.

He stood on his oath, even to the point of giving up his job as the top Judicial Authority in the State of Alabama. We know there must something wrong in America when an appointed federal judge has the power to tell a duly elected State Supreme Court Judge that he cannot acknowledge God and thus fulfill his oath of office.

Starting July 31, Veterans will support rallies by displaying this Ten Commandment Monument from coast to coast. Those Veterans wishing to join in this cause may post their comments and offer their assistance at www.StandingforGod.org or by calling American Veterans in Houston at 281-591-4705. To host a rally contact us.

Veterans Will Take Display On Tour
By Thom Marshall / Houston Chronicle
A Houston-based veterans’ organization plans to tour the country with a religious monument that cost an Alabama chief justice his job last year when he defied a federal order to take it from display in a public building. “We have signed an agreement with Judge Roy Moore,” Jim Cabaniss, president of American Veterans In Domestic Defense, said Friday. Moore will retain ownership of his massive Ten Commandments monument but is lending it to the veterans’ group for the tour, Cabaniss said. Cabaniss said he and other veterans in the organization will be in Alabama on Monday “to move it out of the dark closet in the Alabama State Supreme Court Building and bring it to the light of day.”

Justice’s Banished Monument to Tour U.S.
By Kyle Wingfield / The Associated Press Writer
MONTGOMERY, Ala. — A veterans group, with the blessing of ousted Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore, said it will take his Ten Commandments monument on a national “God Bless America” tour. The 5,280-pound granite monument, out of public view for nearly a year after Moore lost a court fight over its display, will be hauled to rallies for three months by the group American Veterans Standing for God and Country.

10 Commandments Monument Going On Tour
LOS ANGELES — A 2½-ton granite monument of the 10 Commandments that was at the center of a court fight in Alabama will be hauled to a series of rallies for three months. The sponoring group is called American Veterans Standing for God and Country. The group’s president said the organization is neither a church nor a military movement. The group is made up of veterans “taking a stand for what is good for our children and grandchildren,” he said.

Roy Moore Appearing With Constitution Party Presidential Candidate
MONTGOMERY, Ala. — Former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore has been appearing with a third-party candidate for president, a move that could endanger his standing with the Alabama GOP. Moore has made a series of speeches nationally with Constitution Party presidential candidate Michael A. Peroutka, a Maryland attorney running on a platform that includes outlawing abortion, abolishing the Internal Revenue Service and making America a Bible-based republic.

Moore Criticizes Play That Opens Friday
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — Former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore has criticized a play opening this Friday in Birmingham. The play, entitled “Judge Roy Moore Is Coming To Dinner,” is set in Birmingham and deals with the issue of two men who get married and then return to the state. Actor Brian Webber plays the part of Moore who visits the dinner to impart his views on gay marriage and family values. The fictional representation of Moore uses actual words the former chief justice used in a ruling he made in 2002. “This sort of ‘theater’ promoting homosexual marriage is a result of federal activism in our court system,” said Moore in a statement released Tuesday. “Homosexual marriage represents a degradation of our morality and a denigration of our society. In Alabama, it is against the law, and if I have anything to do with it, it will remain against the law.”

Senators Discuss Religion, Federal Authority
On June 8, the Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on the Constitution in Washington, D.C. heard arguments from various United States Senators on the immediate need for restrictions to be placed on Supreme Court judges. Among those involved were Sen. Richard Shelby, R-Ala, and former Alabama chief justice Roy Moore, who was removed from office after refusing a court order to remove the Ten Commandments display from a courthouse. The purpose of the hearing, titled, “Beyond the Pledge of Allegiance: Hostility to Religious Expression in the Public Square,” was to establish to the subcommittee that legislation must be sought out to prevent federal courts and its judges from overstepping the appropriate jurisdiction when it comes to matters of religious expression.

Roy Moore Says Ruling Illustrates Need For Federal Legislation
MONGOMERY, Ala. — Roy Moore is weighing in on today’s Supreme Court ruling rejecting a California atheist’s challenge to the Pledge of Allegiance. The high court ruled the man couldn’t sue over the pledge’s reference to God. Moore said the original ruling in the case by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals illustrates the need for Congress to pass a measure curbing the power of federal courts to interfere in the public acknowledgment of God. Moore, in a statement, said the Supreme Court dismissed the case on legality and its decision could result in another challenge to the words “one nation, under God.” “If the Constitution Restoration Act 2004, were to be passed in Congress,” said Moore. “The federal courts could never again be used to strike down the constitutionality of the Pledge of Allegiance. Congress should take action now to save the pledge and other public acknowledgements of God.”

Roy Moore Urges Congress to Protect Religious Expression
WASHINGTON — The Alabama chief justice ousted from office for refusing to remove a Ten Commandments monument from his courthouse urged Congress yesterday to make a clear a distinction between government’s legal acknowledgment of religion and illegal promotion of it. Roy Moore repeatedly cited from memory statements by George Washington, James Madison and Thomas Jefferson during his testimony as part of a Senate panel discussion on “Beyond the Pledge of Allegiance: Hostility to Religious Expression in the Public Square.” Even that title sparked debate among senators. “I believe in separation of church and state quite strongly, but separation of church and state does not separate this country — and never has and never will — from God,” Moore said.

Candidate endorsed by Roy Moore
beats current justice in primary

MONTGOMERY, Ala. — Roy Moore’s hand-picked candidate to replace himself as Alabama’s chief justice won a tightly contested primary battle June 1 over one of Moore’s former colleagues. With the vast majority of the state’s precincts reporting, former Moore aide Tom Parker defeated current Justice Jean Brown by a 51-49 percent margin in the state’s Republican primary for the chief justice position. Parker will face Democrat Robert Smith in the general election.

He’s Not on the Ballot,
but Roy Moore Has a Role in Tuesday’s Primary

Tom Parker is used to speaking to crowds. He got plenty of practice as a spokesman for former Chief Justice Roy Moore. Now, Parker wants his own seat on the state Supreme Court. Parker says he never gets tired of being associated with Moore. “No, it’s an honor,” says Parker. “We had a man who stood for principle over position, paycheck, or even pension,” he adds.

Judge throws out lawsuit to restore Moore to bench
MONTGOMERY — A federal judge dismissed a Christian broadcaster’s lawsuit to have Roy Moore reinstated as chief justice. U.S. District Judge Truman Hobbs rejected Kelly McGinley’s claim that her federal due process and voting rights were violated when the non-elected state Court of the Judiciary removed Moore from office for ethics violations. Hobbs issued only a one-page order Friday in declining the suit by McGinley, who hosts a radio talk show in Mobile. Her attorney, Jim Zeigler of Mobile, said he would “prayerfully consider” whether to file an appeal with the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. “The legal options for restoring Judge Moore to the bench are getting slimmer and slimmer,” Zeigler said in a statement issued Monday. “It will probably take political action by Alabama voters to return Judge Moore to office.”

Alabama Senate passes Ten Commandments amendment
The Alabama Senate reacted to the removal of the Ten Commandments from the Alabama Judicial Building by passing a proposed constitutional amendment Tuesday that calls for their display in public buildings. The 28-0 vote by the Senate sends the proposed constitutional amendment to the House for consideration. If approved by the House, the legislation will go before Alabama voters in the primary election June 1.

Roy Moore-Inspired Bill Limits Federal Courts
A bill pending in both houses of Congress, the “Constitution Restoration Act,” would prohibit federal courts from ruling in cases involving government officials who acknowledge God “as the sovereign source of law, liberty or government.” The bill, sponsored in the House by Rep Robert Aderholt, R-Ala., and in the Senate by Sen Richard Shelby, R-Ala., was birthed in the aftermath of the ouster of former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore, who was sanctioned by the courts for acknowledging God by way of a Ten Commandments monument in the state’s judicial building. Moore was on hand in Washington when the bills were introduced last month. Supporters of the bill cite Article III, Section 2 of the U.S. Constitution, which authorizes Congress to limit the jurisdiction of the U.S. Supreme Court and other federal courts.

Voter pleads Moore case in U.S. court
A lawsuit seeking the reinstatement of former Chief Justice Roy Moore should be thrown out of federal court, the Alabama attorney general’s office argued Thursday. The temporary state Supreme Court, set up to decide on Moore’s appeal after the Supreme Court recused itself, heard oral arguments for Moore’s appeal last month, but has yet to hand down a decision. Johnny Davis, attorney for the plaintiff Kelly McGinley, countered that since his case raised different issues than those raised in Moore’s appeals, it shouldn’t be dropped. McGinley contends that the JIC was illegally formed, and therefore its decision in the Moore case should not be binding.

Judge Moore: Acknowledgement of
God was at center of controversy

MONTGOMERY, Ala. — The removal of the 5,300-pound Ten Commandments monument from the rotunda of the Alabama State Judicial Building does not represent a battle to display a religious document, former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore says. It is a battle over the right Americans have to publicly acknowledge God.

AMERICA THE BEAUTIFUL

America the Beautiful, or so you used to be.
Land of the Pilgrims’ pride; I’m glad they’ll never see.
Babies piled in dumpsters, Abortion on demand,
Oh, sweet land of liberty, your house is on the sand.

We’ve voted in a government that’s rotting at the core,
Appointing godless Judges who throw reason out the door,
Too soft to place a killer in a well deserved tomb,
But brave enough to kill a baby before he leaves the womb.

You think that God’s not angry, that our land’s a moral slum?
How much longer will He wait before His judgment comes?
How are we to face our God, from Whom we cannot hide?
What then is left for us to do, but stem this evil tide?

~ Judge Roy Moore

No Decision This Week in Roy Moore Appeal
Court officials said Thursday a decision on Roy Moore’s appeal of his ouster as chief justice will not come this week, meaning at least a month will have passed since a fill-in Supreme Court held a hearing on his expulsion. The replacement court has said it would announce its decision on a Friday, the normal day for Supreme Court rulings to be released. But the panel said its verdict would not come this Friday, court spokesman David Williams said. In that case, the earliest date for a verdict would be March 26, though it could come much later.

Ashland University Packed For Judges
ASHLAND — Richland County Common Pleas Judge James DeWeese met his ally in the battle to display the Ten Commandments. Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore joined DeWeese in addressing a packed audience Monday night in the Ashland University Convocation Center. They addressed the crowd of more than 1,000 people about the rule of law they are accused of violating. “The law is the highest authority and all men, even the highest officials, are subject to that same law,” DeWeese said. “The evolving-constitution doctrine is an unconstitutional doctrine,” DeWeese said. Moore then took over the podium: “When a judge puts himself above the rule of law, he becomes a tyrant,” Moore said.

Alabama Justice to Speak at Crowley’s Ridge
PARAGOULD — Former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore will be the guest speaker at Crowley’s Ridge College’s annual “Spirit of America” program on April 2. Moore gained national attention for the 5,300-pound Ten Commandments monument that he had placed in the rotunda of the Alabama Judicial Building about six months after taking office in January 2001. It was removed in August 2003, and Moore was suspended without pay then removed from the bench Nov. 14. He is challenging his removal.

Judge Moore Does Not Support Marriage Amendment
Chief Justice Roy Moore does not support an amendment to ban gay marriage. He says renegade courts would cause problems. Moore believes that if marriage is constitutionally defined as between a man and a woman, some judge would allow a man to marry his sister or daughter. He believes a better solution is for Congress to pass the Constitution Restoration Act (PDF Format). This Act would stop courts from forbidding the acknowledgement of God as the basis of law. He says marriage between a man and a woman is what God intended.

Justice Moore Spreads the Word in Northwest
Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore has a speaking tour that takes him around the country to events such as Saturday’s “Profiles in Courage” banquet, where he was honored along with a 98-year-old man who holds a daily anti-abortion vigil outside a local abortion clinic. “I’m waking up something in people,” Moore said in an interview. “When you speak the truth, people will flock to it.” The presidential-campaign talk began the instant Moore was removed from the bench, when supporters in the Montgomery courthouse began chanting, “Roy Moore for president.”

Crum Wants Moore To Stay Home
Party officials say their political calendar cannot wait for Moore’s legal battle to run its course, and the party’s Alabama chairman said it might be better for Moore to be his party’s gubernatorial candidate in 2006. “Judge Moore is still involved in his legal battle, and by the time he gets finished with that, even if he were finished by our June convention, that’s really pushing the envelope for running a national race like this,” said Alabama party Chairman Don Crum of Holly Pond.

Acting Supreme Court Tough on Moore’s Attorneys
A decision could come Friday in Judge Roy Moore’s appeal for his job. The former chief justice is not likely to win. The acting Supreme Court was tough on Moore’s attorneys during the appeal hearing Wednesday. Four of the 7 questioned the argument that Moore was upholding his oath when he defied a federal judge’s order to remove a Ten Commandments monument from the state courthouse. There is no deadline for a ruling in this case, but a decision could come as early as today.

Alabama’s Chief Justice ‘made an oath to God’
Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore was acting within his duty to acknowledge God when he was stripped of his office for refusing to remove a Ten Commandments monument from a courthouse, his lawyers said on Wednesday. “Chief Justice Moore made an oath to God, not to a federal judge,” said lawyer Phillip Jauregui in arguments before the Alabama Supreme Court as Moore, a fundamentalist Christian, looked on. Moore contended the district court order was unlawful, flying in the face of his constitutional obligation to acknowledge God in his former position as chief justice of the Bible Belt state.

Roy Moore Still Fighting
Attorneys for former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore argued Wednesday that the federal court order Moore disobeyed is itself unethical. The seven retired judges assigned to hear Moore’s appeal listened to arguments from Moore’s attorney Phillip Jauregai that Moore’s oath of office had bound him to follow the constitution and acknowledge God. The state attorney general’s office, however, told the court that Moore’s argument would lead to anarchy.

Roy Moore Fights To Get His Job Back
Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore’s appeal to get his job back is getting underway in downtown Montgomery. The seven retired judges assigned to hear Moore’s appeal are preparing to take the bench, knowing they won’t become election day targets if activists disagree with their ruling. Moore’s defenders say the absence of voting booth accountability is one reason they objected to the selection process in which retired judges’ names were drawn at random to form the stand-in supreme court. The court will hear oral arguments beginning at 1:30 pm Today at the Alabama Judicial Building.

Bill Pryor Got His Judas Money
Bill Pryor is even worse than a judicial tyrant. He is a Judas turncoat who obtained his position by lying to Governor Fob James and the people of Alabama and by betraying a man far greater in honor and character than himself.

Christians Rally in Montgomery
Supporters of Chief Justice Roy Moore are calling on Christians to stand up against Attorney General Bill Pryor and his nomination to be a federal judge. About two dozen protestors rallied at the State Capitol asking state and federal leaders to revoke Pryor’s nomination. They called Pryor a hypocrite for prosecuting Moore before the Alabama Court of the Judiciary.

Moore Supporters Ask Christians To Oppose Pryor
MONTGOMERY, Ala. — About two-dozen supporters of Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore called on fellow Christians to take a stronger stance against Attorney General Bill Pryor and his nomination for a federal judgeship. Thursday’s meeting was led by the Rev. Frank Raddish, founder and director of the Washington-based Capitol Hill Independent Baptist Ministries, who has held three Montgomery rallies in the past six months asking President George W. Bush and state leaders to revoke Pryor’s nomination and reinstate Moore as chief justice.

Pryor Urges Federal Judge to
Dismiss Suit by Moore backer

MONTGOMERY, Ala. — A Christian broadcaster’s federal lawsuit seeking to reinstate ousted Chief Justice Roy Moore should be dismissed because her voting rights weren’t violated, a state prosecutor said. Kelly McGinley of Mobile claimed her federal due process and voting rights were violated when the non-elected state Court of the Judiciary removed Moore from office for ethics violations. McGinley’s suit named Attorney General Bill Pryor, the state Judicial Inquiry Commission, the Court of the Judiciary and state Comptroller Bob Childree as defendants. It said Moore’s removal from office over the Ten Commandments monument “illegally overturned the results of the November 2000 election” and rendered her vote “null and void.”

State Attorneys Argue Against Lawsuit to Reinstate Moore
MONTGOMERY – Lawyers for the state urged a federal court Wednesday to reject a lawsuit aimed at reinstating Roy Moore as chief justice of Alabama. A suit by Kelly McGinley, a Christian radio broadcaster in Mobile, contends that her federal due process and voting rights were violated when the non-elected state Court of the Judiciary removed Moore from office for ethics violations. Assistant Attorney General Jack Park, representing Attorney General Bill Pryor and the other defendants, said the Voting Rights Act prohibits violations of the right to vote on account of race, color or language minority. “McGinley is a white female, so it is difficult to see how she fits within a protected category,” Park told U.S. District Judge Truman Hobbs in written arguments filed Wednesday.

Moore Calls for Law Permitting ‘Acknowledgment of God’
PRATTVILLE, Ala. — Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore called for a law Friday to prevent federal judges from hearing cases involving acknowledgments of God — from public displays of the Ten Commandments to the phrase ”one nation under God” in the pledge of allegiance. Joined by congressmen from Alabama and elsewhere, Moore said the proposed federal law, titled the Constitution Restoration Act, is necessary because the federal judiciary for decades has denied the rights of states and individuals to decide the role of religion in society. ”They have been usurping the role of the legislative branch, and it must stop,” Moore said.

Judge Moore Introduces Constitution Restoration Act 2004
MONTGOMERY, Ala. — Alabama’s Sen. Richard Shelby (R-AL) and Rep. Robert Aderholt (R-Haleyville) join with former Chief Justice Roy S. Moore in introducing the Constitution Restoration Act 2004 to restrict the appellate jurisdiction of the United States Supreme Court and all lower federal courts to that jurisdiction permitted them by the Constitution of the United States.

Roy Moore Supports Change in Congress
Chief Justice Roy Moore is calling for a law to prevent federal judges from hearing cases involving acknowledgments of God. If passed by Congress and signed by the president, the law would bar federal courts from judging whether acts or displays violate the constitution’s ban on government promotion of religion. It would apply to public displays like Moore’s Ten Commandments monument, as well as the phrase “one nation under God” in the pledge of allegiance and the slogan “in God we trust” on U.S. coins. Opponents say the law would violate the constitution’s separation of powers. But Moore and his supporters say it’s the federal judiciary that has overstepped its bounds.

Justice Roy Moore to speak in Great Falls
Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore, ousted from office for refusing to remove a Ten Commandments monument, will speak in Great Falls on Friday, Feb. 27. He will be keynote speaker at a special Montana Constitution Party event. According to state Constitution Party Chairman Jonathan Martin, Moore will discuss the question, “Can the state acknowledge God?”

Alabama Attorney General Says Duty Trumps Religion
Pryor maintains that federal judges make the law

Alabama Attorney General Bill Pryor spoke at Harvard Law School Friday about how he placed his deference to law above his religious beliefs in his handling of the national controversy around the Ten Commandments monument. Pryor said Friday that Moore, in defying a court order, had neglected the duties of his judgeship. “Judges, of all, have an obligation to respect the law even when they disagree with it,” Pryor said. “But I don’t see how a Christian can get around the commands of the government—to remain a public official and defy the law,” he said.

In Defense of Chief Justice Roy S. Moore
The key to understanding Attorney General Pryor’s stance is that he believes that courts make law and, by extension, that the official’s oath of office is one of allegiance to the judiciary and not to the Constitution itself.

Legislative Proposal to Abolish Alabama’s Judicial Panel,
and limit power to remove judges to impeachment process

MONTGOMERY, Ala. — The debate over the ouster of former Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore and his fight to keep a Ten Commandments monument in the Alabama Judicial Building could spill over into the Alabama Legislature. Lawmakers are expected to consider in the regular session, which begins Tuesday, a proposal to abolish the judicial panel which brought the charges that led to Moore being stripped of his office.

Pryor Files Brief in Response to Moore’s Appeal
Here’s an update on the Ten Commandments controversy. Attorney General Bill Pryor filed a brief Thursday in response to Judge Roy Moore’s appeal. Moore is appealing the November decision of the Alabama Court of the Judiciary to remove him from office. He was removed for failing to obey a judge’s order to move the Ten Commandments monument from the state building. Attorney General Bill Pryor filed a brief saying the board made the right decision. Pryor also argued that the judiciary did not punish Moore because of his religious beliefs.[?]

Pryor: Court was correct to remove Moore
MONTGOMERY — The decision of a legal panel to remove former Chief Justice Roy Moore from office was correct and not based on Moore’s Christian beliefs, Attorney General Bill Pryor said Thursday in a brief filed with the Alabama Supreme Court. In appealing the Court of the Judiciary’s Nov. 13 decision, Moore argued that he was removed from office because he failed a “religious test” in which he had to choose between his job and his allegiance to God. Moore must file a reply to Pryor’s brief by Feb. 12. Court officials have said the replacement court would schedule oral arguments after receiving Moore’s reply. Moore has argued that moving the monument would have forced him to “forsake an acknowledgment of God.”

Retired Judges Sworn in to Hear Justice Moore’s Appeal
Seven retired judges with a total of 139 years of experience were sworn in Monday to be the temporary Supreme Court charged with hearing Chief Justice Roy Moore’s appeal for his job. After the swearing-in, the judges sat for an official photograph, then retired to chambers to discuss the case. It was the first meeting of the special court, which was created in December after all eight members of the Supreme Court recused themselves from hearing Moore’s appeal.

Court to Hear Moore Case
(The Associated Press) — A special seven-member Alabama Supreme Court was sworn in Monday to hear Judge Roy Moore’s appeal of his ouster as chief justice. Former Alabama governor and former criminal appeals court judge John Patterson is serving as chief justice for the special Supreme Court. The special court was selected because all members of the regular Supreme Court stepped aside from hearing Moore’s case. Moore is appealing his ouster by the Alabama Court of the Judiciary.

Protester Arrested in Montgomery Found Guilty of
Criminal Trespassing — Given Three Months Probation

Walter Wayne Kennedy held hands and prayed with his wife, his attorney and friends while waiting for a Montgomery County jury to return a verdict on his criminal trespassing charge. The jury returned a verdict against the Prattville man in less than half an hour. “I’m disappointed in the verdict,” Kennedy said after the trial. “Maybe this will wake up people that’s asleep of what’s going on, what the judges are doing behind closed doors.”

Roy Moore defends stance on Ten Commandments
Chief Justice Roy Moore who defied a federal order to remove a Ten Commandments monument from his state judicial building last summer defended the controversial decision to about 500 supporters in Lancaster Saturday. “It is the most heartbreaking thing for me to hear Chief Justice Roy Moore called the lawbreaker,” said Howard Phillips, Chairman of the Conservative Caucus, introducing Moore at the Lancaster Host Resort. “He’s the lawkeeper, isn’t he?” The Pennsylvania Constitution Party hosted Moore at a conference on the biblical foundations of American law.

Moore’s Defense Fund to Raise Money for Barrow
WINDER – A legal defense fund for former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore has pledged financial and legal support to Georgia’s Barrow County in its fight to display the Ten Commandments in its county courthouse. The Birmingham-based Foundation for Moral Law Incorporated is working with lead counsel Herb Titus of Virginia, who was part of Moore’s legal team, to help Barrow County.

Moore urges fight for God
ANNAPOLIS — Former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore, ousted from office for refusing to remove a Ten Commandments monument from the state Judicial Building, told Maryland legislators and onlookers yesterday to “take a stand” against the federal government. “Every state’s constitution, including the state of Maryland’s, acknowledges God,” Mr. Moore told a crowd of nearly 200 legislators and supporters at a rally outside the State House. “A lot of people think it was about a monument, and it wasn’t. It was about God.” Said Mr. Moore: “That is the issue all across this land. The question is, can we as a state, can we as a nation acknowledge God.”

Alabama Judge Delivered a Fire-And-Brimstone Speech
ANNAPOLIS, Md. — Roy Moore, former chief justice of the Alabama Supreme Court, delivered a fire-and-brimstone speech Tuesday to about 150 people outside the State House, urging them to fight for the right to display the Ten Commandments on government property. “What this issue is about is whether or not we can continue to acknowledge God,” Moore said. “Many people say, ‘Oh, but you’re being unfair to Buddhists, to Hindus.’ We must understand that it is this God upon which this nation is founded, not any other God.”

Roy Moore before lawmakers in Maryland
ANNAPOLIS, Md. — With partisanship becoming more commonplace in Annapolis, even religion can be a contentious topic in the state legislature. Some Republican lawmakers are asking the General Assembly to pass a resolution supporting Roy Moore, the former chief justice of the Alabama Supreme Court, who was ousted for refusing to remove a Ten Commandments monument from the state judicial building.

Judge Roy Moore To Speak At Benefit
WEST CHICAGO — Judge Roy S. Moore will speak at a dinner benefit for Wheaton Academy here. The benefit will be Friday at the academy. Cost is $100 a plate. Tickets may be purchased by calling Janet Vlk at (630) 562-7511. Moore will share his views on the separation of church and state in light of his removal.

Moore’s Request to Cancel Special Court Rejected
The Alabama Supreme Court has rejected Roy Moore’s request to cancel the appointment of a seven-member replacement court to hear his appeal of his ouster as chief justice. In a two-sentence order issued Tuesday, the Supreme Court unanimously denied Moore’s motion without elaborating.

Pryor asks For Denial of Moore Request
Attorney General Bill Pryor in a court filing says there was nothing unusual or illegal about the Alabama Supreme Court randomly selecting retired judges to hear the appeal of ousted Supreme Court Justice Roy Moore. The names of the seven judges were drawn randomly to consider Moore’s appeal of the Alabama Court of the Judiciary removing him from office for refusing a federal judge’s order.

Justice Seeks Reinstatement
MONTGOMERY, Ala. — Roy Moore, who was ousted as Alabama’s chief justice for refusing to remove a Ten Commandments monument from the state judicial building, asked the state Supreme Court on Thursday to return him to office. Moore argued in legal briefs that his expulsion sets a “dangerous precedent” and requires judges to deny their oath of office and religious faith. He said he lost his post because he failed a “religious test” that forced him to choose between his job and his allegiance to God.

The Tourist Attraction That Isn’t There
Montgomery, Ala. — For visitors to the capital of Alabama, the granite monument of the Ten Commandments is the most popular attraction that isn’t there. In the rotunda of the state Supreme Court building, behind the U.S. and Alabama flags, the floor shows only vague scuff marks where the monument used to sit. But even in its absence, the Ten Commandments has a presence.

Roy Moore’s Attorneys Blast ‘Illegal’ Selection Process
Attorneys for former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore say the seven retired judges named to hear an appeal of Moore’s ouster were chosen through an illegal process. Acting Chief Justice Gorman Houston — with the blessing of Governor Riley — had the retired judges’ names drawn at random from a box to form a replacement court to hear Moore’s appeal. But a motion filed by Moore’s attorneys contends state law requires the governor to choose court replacements. The motion also argues that the Alabama Supreme Court in a 2000 ruling said judges who have stepped down from hearing a case “can take no further action in that case, not even the action of reassigning the case.”

Moore Picks Two New Lawyers for Appeal
MONTGOMERY, Ala. — Birmingham attorney Phillip Jauregui is leading the legal team that is appealing the decision by the Alabama Court of the Judiciary to remove Judge Roy Moore from office. Moore’s attorneys during his trial before the Court of the Judiciary – Terry Butts of Troy, Jim Wilson of Montgomery and Mike Jones of Luverne – are assisting the legal team “in an advisory capacity,” Jessica Atteberry, spokeswoman for Moore, said Tuesday. Attorneys Drew Dill and Benjamin DuPre, who worked for Moore when he was chief justice, are also working with the legal team.

Additional Judges Ask to Be Excused From Appeal of Ten Commandments Judge
MONTGOMERY, Ala. — Two of the seven retired judges selected to hear Roy Moore’s appeal of his ouster as chief justice have asked to be excused from the case, a day after the entire Supreme Court disqualified itself from the dispute over his Ten Commandments display. The seven replacement judges had been selected in a random lottery Monday, and two asked to be excused, one citing past connections with the Court of the Judiciary, the ethics panel that ousted Moore. They will be replaced by alternates.

Retired judges named to hear Moore’s appeal
MONTGOMERY, Ala. — Seven retired judges, including a former governor, were selected randomly in a lottery Monday to hear Roy Moore’s appeal of his ouster as chief justice in his Ten Commandments monument case. The drawing came just hours after all eight Supreme Court justices disqualified themselves from hearing the appeal because of their earlier involvement in the monument case.

A Second Change is Made on Seven Member Court to Hear Moore Appeal
Montgomery — The makeup of the replacement Supreme Court that will hear Roy Moore’s appeal of his ouster as chief justice changed today as a second retired judge was replaced after asking to be removed from the panel. Moore’s defense team also expressed objections to two other of the seven replacement justices, retired Supreme Court Justice Janie Shores and retired Mobile County Circuit Judge Braxton Kittrell, Jr. Moore’s attorney, Phillip Jauregui questioned Shores serving on the replacement court because Moore had terminated her service as a paid retired member of the Supreme Court.

Moore’s Appeal Panel Changes
MONTGOMERY – The makeup of the replacement Supreme Court that will hear Roy Moore’s appeal of his ouster as chief justice changed Tuesday as a second retired judge was replaced after asking to be removed from the panel. Moore’s defense team objected to two other of the seven replacement justices, retired Supreme Court Justice Janie Shores and retired Mobile County Circuit Judge Braxton Kittrell Jr.

Judge Moore Has Until Jan. 8 to File Full Appeal
Attorneys for Judge Roy Moore have until Jan. 8 to file briefs supporting his appeal of his removal from office by a state judicial panel. Moore on Wednesday filed notice that he was appealing the Nov. 13 decision of the Alabama Court of the Judiciary for refusing to obey a federal judge’s order that he move a Ten Commandments monument from the rotunda of the Alabama Judicial Building. Judge Moore next must file briefs with the Alabama Supreme Court explaining why he believes the Court of the Judiciary was wrong to remove him from office. By law, he must file those briefs within 28 days of the certification of the transcript and record of the trial.

Who Is America’s Sovereign?
The overarching question we face today is: “Who is America’s Sovereign?” and “What is His law?”. Chief Justice Roy Moore knows the correct answers, but Federal Judge Myron Thompson flunks the test. The Holy Bible makes clear that Jesus Christ is our Sovereign. He is King of Kings, Lord of Lords, the Ruler of all nations. America’s Founding Fathers understood and acted on this Biblical truth. In our Declaration of Independence, they proclaimed that we are endowed by our Creator with certain unalienable rights. And they enunciated the truth that government derives its just powers from the consent of the governed.

Call, Write, and Email President Bush and
Talk Shows in support of Justice Roy Moore

Encourage Your Pastor to Preach a Message on the Biblical Duty of Civil Magistrates to Stand for Christ: This Sunday and the following, church shepherds from across America should take a stand for Christ by preaching on the importance that the state acknowledge God, on Romans 13 and the biblical doctrine of interposition, and by explaining the story of Chief Justice Moore, a modern day Daniel.

Moore Files Notice of Appeal; Asks Houston to Step Down from Case
MONTGOMERY, Ala. — Judge Roy Moore filed notice Wednesday that he is appealing his removal from office by a state judicial panel. In two motions filed with the Alabama Supreme Court, Moore also asked that acting Chief Justice Gorman Houston step down, or be ordered by the court to disqualify himself from hearing Moore’s appeal because of statements Houston has made to news reporters about the case. The motion also says Houston would stand to gain personally from Moore being unsuccessful in his appeal because it would allow him to serve longer as acting chief justice. “Justice Houston has made numerous comments and has taken actions indicating that his impartiality may reasonably be questioned or that he has a personal bias or prejudice toward Chief Justice Moore,” said the motion filed by Moore attorneys Phillip Jauregui and Andrew Dill.

‘God resolution’ Sweeps State
A resolution proclaiming God as the foundation of American heritage is sweeping through the state, despite the protest of civil rights groups. Written and first passed in Greene County, the ‘God resolution’ was drafted in reaction to a federal court decision to force the removal of a Ten Commandments monument from the Alabama State Supreme Court. Greene County sent the resolution out to the other 94 counties in Tennessee for approval, asking officials to support the proclamation in the Tennessee’s General Assembly’s January 2004 session.

Attorney Files to Keep Moore Lawsuit in Mobile
MOBILE — An attorney for a Christian talk show host suing to return former Chief Justice Roy Moore to office filed a motion today to keep the case in Mobile. Mobile lawyer Jim Zeigler contends the suit should be heard in Mobile County because that’s where talk show host Kelly McGinley voted for Moore in 2000 and because the defendants have statewide jurisdiction, including her voting district. Attorney General Bill Pryor has sought to dismiss or move the lawsuit to Montgomery. McGinley alleges she has been “disenfranchised” as a voter by the removal of Moore. Federal Judge William H. Steele has given attorneys until December 15th to respond to Zeigler’s motion.

Ten Commandments Judge to Fight for Job
MONTGOMERY, Ala. — Judge Roy Moore, ousted from the Alabama Supreme Court for refusing to remove a Ten Commandments monument from the state Judicial Building rotunda, announced Thursday he will fight to get his job back. Moore issued a statement saying he will file an appeal of his removal from office with the Alabama Supreme Court by Dec. 10. Moore is also talking with publishers about writing a book on his life and his efforts to acknowledge God, said his spokeswoman, Jessica Atteberry. No agreement has been reached, she said.

Roy Moore Plans Appeal
Former Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy S. Moore has announced that he will be filing an appeal on or before Dec. 10, 2003, regarding his removal of office by the Court of Judiciary. On Nov. 13, 2003, Moore was removed from his publicly elected position as chief justice for failing to obey an unlawful federal court order which would require him to break his pledge to the people of Alabama and his oath to the Alabama Constitution and the Constitution of the United States, and for saying that if he were restored to his elected office he would continue to acknowledge God. The appeal will be filed with the Alabama Supreme Court. For more information on this case and the Ten Commandments case, visit the website for the Foundation for Moral Law, Inc., at www.morallaw.org.

Roy Moore Appeals Removal From Office
Former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore will appeal his removal from office by tomorrow. Alabama’s nine-member Court of the Judiciary voted unanimously to oust Moore Nov. 13 for defiance of a federal judge’s order to remove a 10 Commandments monument he installed in the rotunda of the state courthouse two years ago. If the ruling stands, Gov. Bob Riley will appoint a new chief justice.

Harris Commission Supports Roy Moore
HAMILTON, Ga. – Harris County commissioners took a strong stand Tuesday night in supporting ousted Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore and spelled out their personal beliefs on acknowledging God in public places. Commissioners expressed support for Moore’s “courageous stand for God to be acknowledged in the United States of America” and demanded that “the Federal Government re-establish the vanishing godly principles that recognize that our rights come from God and not from the government and that we are a nation under God.”

Moore Plans to File Appeal this Week
Judge Roy Moore may appeal his removal as Chief Justice by Thursday. Moore’s attorneys say the appeal is almost ready. Moore wants to make a few changes before filing it. Three weeks ago, the Court of the Judiciary voted unanimously to remove Moore as Alabama’s Chief Justice. The court says Moore violated the Canons of Judicial Ethics when he refused a judge’s order to move a monument of the Ten Commandments.

Lawsuit Seeks to Return Moore to Office Soon
Though former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore may have laid low over the Thanksgiving holidays, his supporters still have their momentum intact. Christian talk show host Kelly McGinley and lawyer Jim Zeigler, both of Mobile, intend to battle for Moore wielding a small spear aimed at the “unconstitutionality” of his removal.

Ten Commandments Displays
While there have been dozens of rulings striking down Ten Commandments displays (another indication that federal judges need to be appointed to the courts who are well-versed in original constitutional understandings); no ruling has been more publicized than that against Judge Roy Moore in Alabama. In that case, the 11th Federal Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that a 5,280 pound granite monument of the Ten Commandments could not be displayed in the rotunda of the Alabama State Judicial Building.

Roy Moore Asks Judge To Remove Himself
Attorneys for former Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore have asked a federal judge to step down from hearing any future arguments in the case involving Moore’s Ten Commandments monument. Moore says U.S. District Judge Myron Thompson shouldn’t be involved in deciding who will pay the hundreds of thousands of dollars in legal fees for attorneys for plaintiffs. The former Chief Justice says Thompson can’t be impartial in the matter because he spoke last month at a legal forum in Atlanta sponsored by the American Civil Liberties Union, one of the groups that sued to have Moore’s monument moved.

Videotape of Moore Trial Available to the Public
MONTGOMERY, Ala. — Anyone who wants to view the trial of former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore can watch it on videotape. The state Supreme Court law library hired a production company for $3,000 to videotape the trial before the Court of the Judiciary, with copies to be available to the public. “My feeling was that it was just too significant an event to not videotape it,” said Tim Lewis, the library’s director. He said he will make copies available to anyone for the cost of copying, about $12.

The People Want Federal Judges Impeached
“Because Judge William C. O’ Kelley ignored the clear message of the U.S. Constitution and substituted his opinion that turned two centuries of America’s history and heritage upside down, the Habersham Ten Commandments Support Committee initiated action to call for the impeachment of Federal Judge William O’ Kelley in an effort to restrict the power of federal courts,” said a statement from the organization. The group has also decided to file an appeal of O’ Kelley’s ruling.

Protesters Rally Against Federal Courts
Declaring that “enough is enough,” a small but enthusiastic group of demonstrators called for Congress to stop federal judges from undercutting what they consider the moral roots of American law. Speakers at the rally on the steps of the Old Capitol mentioned court rulings on homosexual marriage and sodomy, legal challenges to the term “under God” in the Pledge of Allegiance and the 1962 U.S. Supreme Court ruling that removed prayer from public schools. Dr. Chuck Baldwin of Pensacola, who hosts a Christian talk-radio show, drew applause from the crowd when he said the Ten Commandments ruling in Alabama was part of an effort by federal judges to end all public recognition of religion or moral principles. “This has always been about the public recognition of God,” said Baldwin, who attended the judicial proceedings that removed Moore. “This issue will determine whether or not Americans have the right to publicly acknowledge God.”

Rally in Columbia to Stop
Federal Sway Over Religion

Conservative Christians held rallies across the nation Saturday to support Moore, who was removed as Alabama’s chief justice 10 days ago. Moore refused to obey a court order to move a Ten Commandments monument he had placed in the rotunda of that state’s highest court. The rallies were sponsored by the National Coalition to Restore the Constitution.

Georgia Rally shows support for Commandments display
ATLANTA — Under the golden dome of the Capitol, the Rev. Jody Hice called last week’s U.S. District Court decision to order the removal of Ten Commandments displays in Habersham County a “disgrace.” “As Georgians, we stand back appalled,” Hice said during the Faith and Freedom rally at the rear steps of the Capitol building Saturday afternoon. On Wednedsay, U.S. District Court Judge William O’Kelley ruled that Habersham County remove Ten Commandments displays from its courthouse and a swimming pool complex. The group Family Concerns said recently it plans to appeal the decision.

Monument Supporters Rally Again at Alabama Capitol
Proponents of public Ten Commandments displays urged supporters Saturday not to let their beliefs be taken away and to be more active in the political process through voting and letting elected officials know their views. The rally, held on the steps of the Alabama state capitol, was part of a series of rallies planned at state capitals across the country. The purpose was to launch a petition drive in support of congressional limits on federal courts when it comes to religious matters.

Poll: 60 Percent Support Moore
More than 60 percent of respondents to a statewide poll don’t think Roy Moore’s Ten Commandment crusade should have cost the former chief justice his job. Many also said they would vote for the former state Supreme Court chief justice if he ran for U.S. senator or even president next year. The poll, conducted Monday through Thursday by the Mobile Register-University of South Alabama, has a 5 percentage point margin of error.

Lawsuits: Moore Removed Illegally
MONTGOMERY – Federal lawsuits filed by voters Thursday claim an unelected ethics panel didn’t have the authority to remove Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore for defying a judge’s order in his Ten Commandments case. The lawsuits filed in Montgomery and Mobile claim that impeachment by the Legislature would have been the only constitutional way to remove an elected chief justice.

Destroying Liberty to Punish a Judge
George Washington, our great nation’s first president, once said, “Government is not reason; it is not eloquence; it is force … It is a dangerous servant and a terrible master.” Former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore learned that lesson the hard way last week, when a judicial panel allegedly of his peers decided to throw him out of office because he refused to obey a faulty order issued by one of Uncle Sam’s judges.

Judge Roy Moore Vows Crusade
OVERLAND PARK, Kan. – Ousted Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore vowed Wednesday night to take his Ten Commandments crusade across the nation. “God created both the state and the church,” Moore told a crowd at First Family Church in Overland Park. “He didn’t say that the state was above him.” In his first major public appearance since being removed as chief of the Alabama Supreme Court last week, Moore said he would travel the country and speak widely with two goals: to persuade Congress to install his Ten Commandments monument, now removed from public display in the Alabama justice building, in the Capitol in Washington; and to win approval of legislation to restrict the jurisdiction of federal courts over the acknowledgement of God by the state.

Transcript of Moore’s Cross Examination Now Online
Read for yourself how Pryor asked Chief Justice Moore 3 times if he would continue to “acknowledge God.” See the proof for yourself that Chief Justice Moore was removed from the bench, not for posting the 10 Commandments, but for acknowledging God. The issue has always been about the public acknowledement of God. Read the transcript.

Voters Want Moore Reinstated
A group of Alabama voters want Roy Moore reinstated, at least temporarily. The five voters filed a federal lawsuit Thursday. They want an impeachment process before the Alabama Legislature. The group says the Alabama Court of Judiciary, which is an appointed panel, removed Moore illegally. The plaintiffs say the lawsuit goes beyond Moore and the Ten Commandments because last week’s actions violated their constitutional and voter rights. Activists say this could be the beginning of similar lawsuits filed across the state. We are not opposed to public officials being held accountable but it shouldn’t crush voters rights.

Federal Lawsuit to be Filed Over Firing of Roy Moore
The suit says Kelly McGinley’s right to vote and her right to due process have been “grossly violated” by the defendants’ actions that have “voided her lawful cast vote.” Defendants in the suit are Attorney General Bill Pryor, the state of Alabama, the Judicial Inquiry Commission, the Court of Judiciary, and state Comptroller Robert Childree, whose office pays state officials. The suit asks a federal judge in Mobile to order Moore back to duty as chief justice, arguing that his ouster last week amounted to overturning his 2000 election.

How To End Judicial Arrogance
In the case of Judge Roy Moore, the irony of it all just smacks you in the face. A federal judge broke the law in requiring Moore to remove the Ten Commandments. The Supreme Court refused to take the case, conveniently ignoring the Ten Commandments plastered on their own building.

Alabama Chief Justice Moore Speaks to Church Group
OVERLAND PARK, Kan. — “We need to wake up to what this country is about, and quit thinking that God dwells in temples made of hands,” Moore said to a crowd of several hundred at a suburban Kansas City church. “We think we can contain him within four walls of a church. I think this is an egregious error.” Moore challenged those in attendance not sit idle, he said, while the nation is being destroyed by the removal of the acknowledgment of God.

Rallies for Religious Freedom Planned in State Capitals Saturday
Rallies at all 50 state Capitols are being organized for Saturday at 1 p.m. to launch a petition drive seeking congressional limits on the federal courts in religious matters. National Coalition to Restore the Constitution (NCRC) is launching the petition in the wake of numerous federal cases that have focused on prohibiting certain religious speech and activities, such as the recent court case concerning Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore. “What we want is for the federal courts to stay within their constitutionally defined boundaries,” NCRC spokeswoman Debbie Hopper explained. “The federal government is only allowed to exercise powers that are listed in the Constitution. Nowhere in the Constitution is the power to decide or legislate over matters of religion, religious speech or activity in the states delegated to the federal government.

Houston: Moore Owes State $7,000 for Moving Monument
Acting Chief Justice Gorman Houston says former Chief Justice Roy Moore should repay the state the $7,000 it cost to move Moore’s Ten Commandments monument into a storage room. But Moore says it was Houston who cost the state unnecessary expense by being overly anxious to remove the $5,300 pound-granite monument from public view. Houston said at a news conference Tuesday that Moore should pay for moving the monument about 50 feet from the rotunda into a first floor storage room. But in a statement, Moore says it was Houston’s actions that cost taxpayers what Moore called an unnecessary expense.

Moore Ponders His Next Steps
Judge Roy Moore met with lawyers Tuesday to decide his next step after being removed from office. Moore can still try to appeal to the Alabama Supreme Court to have himself reinstated, an appeal acting Chief Justice Gorman Houston said he plans to hear if it comes before him. Houston said the law does not require him to step down from hearing the case. Moore now has 30 days to make an appeal against his removal from the Alabama Supreme Court, but a Moore spokeswoman said it is still unclear whether that will be the choice Moore and his attorneys make.

Citizens React to Judge Roy Moore’s Removal
Shelby County leaders such as State Sen. Hank Erwin feel the Alabama Court of the Judiciary acted without authority when it voted unanimously Thursday to remove Moore. Erwin agrees with Moore in displaying the Ten Commandments in government offices. “They’re the foundation of our moral law,” Erwin said following Moore’s ouster last Thursday. State Rep. Cam Ward said people should be concerned over the federal government’s involvement in state decisions, no matter their personal feelings about Moore. “Whether you agree or disagree with Judge Moore, I’m concerned about federal judges imposing on local decisions,” he said, calling it a “scary trend.”

Bill Pryor’s Shocking Comments During Roy Moore’s “Trial”
Following up on my last column, it is extremely important that every American citizen read the exchange between Alabama Attorney General Bill Pryor and Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore during Moore’s trial. Since The Court of the Judiciary did not allow television cameras or recording devices in the courtroom, it is up to people like me to get the word out to the American people as to what Pryor said. The examination of Chief Justice Moore by Bill Pryor is shocking, to say the least.

Roy Moore Plans Bill To Curb Federal Courts
Chief Justice Roy Moore said, “In recent years, federal judges have usurped state power with regard to the acknowledgment of God.” Moore said he is proposing legislation under Article III of the U.S. Constitution, which grants Congress the power to limit the jurisdiction of the lower federal courts and to make any exceptions and regulations of the appellate jurisdiction of the U.S. Supreme Court as it deems necessary. He said he has been advised not to release the complete details of the legislation until Congress convenes in the new year.

This Letter from Kayla Moore explains the need
Words are inadequate to express my appreciation to you and the Foundation for Moral Law for assuming responsibility for the original “Ten Commandments Defense Fund.” At the conclusion of the trial before the Federal Court in December, the Defense Fund was deeply in debt with more than $350,000.00 owed to my husband’s attorneys for their services. To make matters worse, the ACLU even asked the Federal Court to sanction our attorneys for simply telling the truth.

Houston Won’t Recuse Himself From Any Moore Appeal
Acting Chief Justice Gorman Houston says he does not plan to step down from hearing any appeal of a judicial panel’s decision to remove former Chief Justice Roy Moore from office. Houston said Monday he knows of nothing in the law that would require him to disqualify himself. Meanwhile, Moore said he believes the federal courts have usurped the authority of the states when it comes to public acknowledgment of God and that he is proposing legislation in Congress to limit the jurisdiction of the federal courts. “Under the Constitution of the United States, federal courts had no jurisdiction over the acknowledgment of God by the individual states,” Moore said.

Acting Chief Justice Reacts To Court Firings
Acting Chief Justice Gorman Houston says the head of the Administrative Office of Courts, Rich Hobson, and the Director of the Legal Division, Tom Parker, were not let go because of their loyalty to the Moore. Gorman says that had nothing to do with it. In fact, he says they were dismissed, in one case because of inappropriate statements made about federal judges during the ten commandments rallies this summer.

Chief Justice Roy Moore’s Court Trial
Due to the blackout and censorship that forbad the public to view the proceedings in Roy Moore’s court trial, Operation Save America thought it prudent to take notes during the trial. This outline is not the actual transcript of this historical trial. It is a compilation of written, key observations taken during the trial. It is not comprehensive nor exhaustive in scope, but provides a general outline of the thoughts and arguments presented.

Moore’s key aides fired from court system after Judge’s removal
Two key aides to former Chief Justice Roy Moore have been dismissed following Moore’s ouster. Rich Hobson, head of the Administrative Office of Courts, was fired Friday. Hobson’s deputy, Tom Parker, general counsel for the Unified Judicial System and director of the Alabama Judicial College, said Saturday he also was fired. In a statement, Moore called the dismissals “exemplary of the vengeful political agenda of those who have long desired the removal of the Ten Commandments and the acknowledgment of God from the rotunda of the Alabama Judicial Building.”

Alabama Judge Roy S. Moore
Roy Moore is trying to start the next American Revolution. He fired the opening shot in August 2001, when the Chief Justice of the Alabama Supreme Court, along with a band of evangelical Christian supporters and a television crew, installed a statue of the Ten Commandments in the state court rotunda.

Roy Moore Plans Counterstrike
After being ousted as Alabama chief justice, Roy Moore vowed to lobby for legislation that would “alter the direction of our country” and didn’t rule out a run for political office. “I haven’t decided on running for anything,” Moore told NBC’s “Today” show after being asked if he’d run for Alabama governor or even for president. Moore on Thursday said he plans to make an announcement next week that could “alter the direction of our country.” The announcement will concern legislation aimed at federal court rulings like the one by U.S. District Judge Myron Thompson that found Moore’s monument unconstitutional, Moore told reporters. “You will hear from me again when it comes to the right to acknowledge God,” Moore told cheering supporters on Thursday, shortly after a state judicial ethics panel threw him off the bench.

Roy’s Removal is Motivation, Says Pastor
The removal of Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore from the bench is more a motivating factor than a deterrent to efforts to have the Ten Commandments displayed in courthouses, according to Dr. Jody Hice, pastor of Bethlehem First Baptist Church in Barrow County. Late Thursday morning, the state Court of the Judiciary in Alabama removed Moore from the bench for his refusal to obey a federal court order to remove his Ten Commandments monument from the rotunda of the Alabama Judicial Building. ”Everybody knew this was coming,” Hice said Thursday. ”It amplifies the greater problem that we’re facing of judicial tyranny.”

Ten Commandments Rallies are Being Planned
for all 50 State Capitols on November 22nd.

The National Coalition to Restore the Constitution is organizing simultaneous rallies in every state capitol to demonstrate nationwide support for the courageous stand taken by Judge Roy Moore in defense of our religious freedom. Our goal is to mobilize tens of thousands of citizens across America to rally at their state capitals to launch a 1st Amendment Petition for Redress of Grievance to Congress demanding that they do their duty, honor their oath and use the power we the people gave them in Article III, Sections 1 and 2 of the Constitution to limit the jurisdiction of the federal courts on the subject of religion to the clear language and intent of the 1st Amendment. Congress will do its duty when “we the people” demand it and require it as a condition of re-election.

Roy Moore Removed From Office
Chief Justice Roy Moore was removed from office today for refusing to obey a federal court order to move his Ten Commandments monument from the rotunda of the state courthouse.

The Alabama Court of the Judiciary unanimously imposed the harshest penalty possible after a one-day trial in which Moore said his refusal was a moral and lawful acknowledgment of God. Prosecutors argued that Moore’s defiance, left unchecked, would harm the judicial system.

Ten Commandments Judge Removed From Bench
MONTGOMERY, Ala. — Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore was removed from office Thursday for refusing to obey a federal court order to move his Ten Commandments monument from the rotunda of the state courthouse. The state Court of the Judiciary unanimously imposed the harshest penalty possible after a one-day trial in which Moore said his refusal was a moral and lawful acknowledgment of God. Prosecutors said Moore’s defiance, left unchecked, would harm the judicial system.

Spokesman: Alabama Court of the Judiciary
Will Issue its Ruling Thursday at 11 a-m.

A spokesman for the Alabama courts said the Alabama Court of the Judiciary will issue its ruling tomorrow on whether suspended Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore violated the canons of judicial ethics. The judicial panel has the power to remove Moore from office, return a lesser penalty such as a reprimand, or find that he did nothing wrong. The nine-member panel will issue its ruling tomorrow (Thursday) at 11 a-m.

Court of Judiciary Deliberates Charges Against Justice Moore
The members of the Alabama Court of the Judiciary have begun to deliberate the charges against suspended Chief Justice Roy Moore. Moore has been charged with violation of the Canons of Judicial Ethics for his refusal to comply with a federal court order to remove a Ten Commandments monument from the rotunda of the state’s judicial building. During Wednesday’s proceedings Attorney General Bill Pryor told the court that Moore should be removed as chief justice because of his “his utterly unrepentant behavior.” Moore has said all along that he was simply following his oath of office.Moore’s attorney Mike Jones said following the closing of arguments that the “Chief Justice has never waivered in his position from day one…I think that it’s time he go back to work.” Jim Wilson said Moore “will not under any circumstances refuse to follow his oath.”

Latest News in the Judge Roy Moore Hearing
Montgomery — Attorneys representing suspended Chief Justice Roy Moore said today he had every legal right to ignore a federal court to remove his Ten Commandments monument from the state judicial building’s rotunda. In opening arguments, defense attorney Jim Wilson denied that federal Judge Myron Thompson’s order to remove the monument was valid. Attorney General Bill Pryor, whose office is prosecuting Moore, has asked the Court of the Judiciary to remove the chief justice from office. Prosecutors rested their case after about an hour. They called no witnesses, but played two videotapes depicting speeches Moore gave on August 14th and August 21st. (Listen to Chief Justice Roy Moore’s Reaction to the order of the state’s associate justices). Moore’s attorney Terry Butts predicts the verdict could be known, possibly by late today. He said he expects the worse. Moore could lose his job, be suspended, reprimanded or exonerated in the trial before the nine-member court, which includes judges, lawyers and private citizens. It would take a unanimous vote to remove him from office halfway into his six-year term.

Prosecution Wraps Up Its Case Against Roy Moore
A defiant Moore again called on the Court of the Judiciary to hold the trial in a larger venue and let cameras show it live. The judicial panel ruled that cameras would be allowed in the courtroom only when the verdict is announced. Moore’s attorney Terry Butts predicts the verdict may come quickly, possibly by late today, and it may remove Moore from office. Experts in Alabama politics and legal traditions say the trial of a chief justice fighting for his job is a first in the state.

Ethics Trial of Alabama Judge to Begin
MONTGOMERY, Ala. — Suspended Chief Justice Roy Moore says he did not violate judicial ethics when he ignored a judge’s order to remove a Ten Commandments monument from his courthouse. “I was just upholding my oath of office. The constitution of Alabama requires me to acknowledge God,” Moore said. The man prosecuting him, Attorney General Bill Pryor, maintains Moore’s action was “sensational flouting of a valid federal injunction.”

Moore Supporters Call on Court to Acquit Him in Ethics Trial
MONTGOMERY, Ala. – The Court of the Judiciary should exonerate Chief Justice Roy Moore of the ethics charges against him as a means of standing against judicial activism, Moore’s supporters said at a rally Sunday. Moore goes on trial before the court Wednesday on charges that he violated judicial ethics canons by refusing to obey U.S. District Judge Myron Thompson’s order that he remove a Ten Commandments monument from the state judicial building.

Chief Justice Pulls No Punches As He Faces Trial Over ‘Acknowledging God’
“I realize I’ve quoted a lot of legal jargon, but it’s very simple: It said that magistrates, judges, are not to intrude in your opinions and restrain Christian principles, godly principles, on the supposition that they have an ill tendency. That’s a complete destruction of religious liberty. And our Supreme Court recognized that that would be an intrusion by the state into the church. Today that’s exactly what’s going on.”

Pryor Calls For Moore’s Permanent Removal
Ethics Trial Begins Today In Montgomery

MONTGOMERY, Ala. — Alabama’s attorney general is calling for suspended chief justice Roy Moore’s permanent removal from office. The demand came late Monday, with Moore’s ethics trial starting today. Attorney general Pryor filed a summary of the state’s case, which blasts Roy Moore’s conduct and lists six ethics violations against the judge. The charges are listed in court papers filed as routine procedure ahead of the trial. In the papers, Pryor explains some of what the state will use as evidence against Moore.

Pryor Tells Panel To Remove Moore From Office
MONTGOMERY, Alabama — Alabama’s attorney general asked a judicial panel on Monday to remove suspended Chief Justice Roy Moore from office for defying a federal judge’s order to take his Ten Commandments monument off public display in the state judicial building. In a pretrial brief filed with the Alabama Court of the Judiciary, Attorney General Bill Pryor said Moore should be removed because he “intentionally and publicly engaged in misconduct, and because he remains unrepentant for his behavior.”

Supporters Seek Court Acquittal of Moore
MONTGOMERY — The Court of the Judiciary should exonerate Chief Justice Roy Moore of the ethics charges against him as a means of standing against judicial activism, Moore’s supporters said at a rally Sunday. Moore goes on trial before the court Wednesday on charges that he violated judicial ethics canons by refusing to obey U.S. District Judge Myron Thompson’s order that he remove a Ten Commandments monument from the state judicial building.

Scores Attend Prayer Vigil for Moore
About 50-75 supporters of suspended Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore gathered in front of the Alabama Judicial Building at the vigil led by the Rev. Patrick Mahoney, director of the Christian Defense Coalition, and Alabama Christian Coalition President John Giles. The five-city tour went to Birmingham on Sunday evening and is due back in Montgomery on Wednesday, where Mahoney invited pro-Moore forces to gather for prayer at 7:30 a.m.

Moore says He Had Duty to Defy
Suspended Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore believes it was his duty to disobey a federal order to remove a Ten Commandments monument, saying “sometimes you have to violate orders when they are unlawful.” In an interview with The Associated Press, the West Point graduate and Vietnam veteran drew parallels between his case and that of Army Lt. William Calley, whose defense to charges of killing civilians in Vietnam in 1968 was that his superiors told him to do it. Calley should have disobeyed that order, Moore said, just as he disobeyed U.S. District Judge Myron Thompson’s order to remove the 2-ton Commandments marker from the rotunda of the Alabama Judicial Building.

Justice Lends Voice to Barrow
WINDER — Embattled Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore told a crowd of hundreds of Ten Commandments supporters Thursday that even though his appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court was rejected, the issue will not die. “You will not become and remain free if you disavow the very God that gave you that freedom,” Moore told the crowd. “When judges take the law into their own hands, it’s called tyranny. When people take the law into their own hands, it’s called anarchy. We must get the power back to the people.”

Moore Dives Into Georgia’s Commandments Battle
WINDER – Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore said Thursday that north Georgia’s Barrow County will be the place to lead the fight to keep the Ten Commandments in public buildings. “This issue will resonate from state to state beginning here. There will be such a loud noise of discontent that no court will be able to refuse it,” said Moore.

Justice Tells Crowd To Keep The Faith
WINDER – Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore told approximately 350 people packing the lawn of the Barrow County Courthouse Thursday that he stands behind the county commission’s insistence on keeping a Ten Commandments display in the courthouse. ”Today in Barrow County we are not going to forsake the Lord God of our fathers,” Moore told the cheering crowd as he stepped onto the courthouse steps.

Judge cheers Commandments in Winder
WINDER — Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore brought his campaign for public display of the Ten Commandments to Barrow County on Thursday, speaking to an enraptured crowd and vowing to continue fighting. Moore, who faces a state ethics hearing next week, seemed undaunted by the U.S. Supreme Court’s refusal to consider his efforts to keep a Ten Commandments monument in the Alabama Judicial Building in Montgomery.

Plaintiffs Want State to Pay Fees in Ten Commandments Case
MONTGOMERY, Ala. — Alabama’s Chief Justice says he is fighting against efforts to have taxpayers pay attorneys’ fees for the people who sued to remove his Ten Commandments monument from a state courts building. A federal judge ruled that Chief Justice Roy Moore violated the U.S. Constitution’s ban on government promotion of religion when he placed the 2 1/2-ton granite monument in the rotunda of the state Judicial Building in the middle of the night two years ago. The U.S. Supreme Court refused this week to hear Moore’s appeal. Now the plaintiffs in that legal battle plan to ask the federal judge for about $832,000 in fees, said Ayesha Khan, attorney for Americans United for Separation of Church and State.

Moore Supporters Take Message Across The State
MONTGOMERY, Ala. — Supporters of Chief Justice Roy Moore plan to tour Alabama in the days before Moore’s trial next week on judicial ethics charges. Alabama Christian Coalition president John Giles said Wednesday that rallies are planned in several cities over four days to encourage members of the Alabama Court of the Judiciary to exonerate Moore. The Judicial Inquiry Commission suspended Moore in August for refusing to move a 5,300-pound monument of the Ten Commandments from the rotunda of the Alabama Judicial Building.

Judge Moore in Winder Today
WINDER – Another pro Ten Commandments rally is planned for noon in Winder Thursday. Suspended Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore is scheduled to be the keynote speaker at the Barrow County Courthouse. John Graham is with the Winder-based Ten Commandments Incorporated. “We’re not going away. We’re going to keep the pressure on and try to keep communities being forward instead of backward as far as putting the Ten Commandments up,” Graham said.

Moore Vows To Continue Fight
PRATTVILLE — A “thunderous roar that’s going to be heard across this country” will be the result of the U.S. Supreme Court’s refusal to hear his case on the controversial Ten Commandments monument, Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore predicted Monday.

The Supreme Court Closed The Door On Judge Moore,
But God Will Open Another One!

Yesterday’s decision by the U.S. Supreme Court to not hear Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore’s Ten Commandments case paves the way for the total removal of America’s public recognition of God. Furthermore, it is yet another nail in the coffin of religious liberty and constitutional governance in the United States. Piece by piece, all vestiges of America’s Christian heritage are being dismantled and destroyed. This is not accidental; it is deliberate. The movers and shakers of this conspiracy have captured the leadership of both major parties, most of the institutions of higher learning, most of the major media, most of the entertainment moguls, and a sizable percentage of our seminaries and churches.

Supreme Court Rejects Moore’s Appeal,
Court won’t enter Ten Commandments fight

WASHINGTON – The Supreme Court refused Monday to enter the long-running fight over a monument depicting the Ten Commandments and the judge who wants to keep it on display in an Alabama courthouse. The court quietly rejected appeals from Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore, who had argued that the monument properly acknowledges “God as the source of the community morality so essential to a self-governing society.” Moore challenged the high court to settle the question once and for all, and accused the justices of ducking their responsibility to clarify murky questions about the constitutional principle of separation of church and state.

Moore Packs Church
Commandments battle inspires cheering crowd

“The country has not seen the likes of Moore in many, many years,” senior pastor Chuck Baldwin told the cheering crowd. “He is a modern-day Patrick Henry and Daniel from the Old Testament.” When Moore finally approached the church’s pulpit on Sunday, he was given a standing ovation. A supporter yelled out, “My hero!” “It’s a sad day in America when you are called a hero for acknowledging God, which this nation was founded on,” Moore responded. “Things have changed in our country.” In his hourlong speech, Moore talked about God’s significance in American history.

Petition Launched To Impeach Federal Judge
“Federal Judge Myron Thompson is wrong,!!” says Frank Raddish, leader of the Capitol Hill Independent Baptist Ministries Coalition out of Washington, D.C. With that proclamation, Raddish pointedly told the crowd of about 100 or so that Judge Myron Thompson did not honestly interpret the constitution when he ordered the 10 commandments removed. 40 minutes later Raddish initiated a petition drive, a petition to have Judge Thompson removed from office.

Moore Lawyers Say He `Can Not Get A Fair Trial,’
His Removal May Be `Inevitable’

Lawyers for suspended Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore say they don’t believe he can get a fair trial before the Alabama Court of the Judiciary on judicial ethics charges. The attorneys said in a statement Thursday that it may be “inevitable” that Moore will be removed from office for not obeying a federal court order to move his Ten Commandments monument from the lobby of the Alabama Judicial Building.

Court Orders Moore Trial Open to Public
The judicial ethics trial of suspended Supreme Court Justice Roy Moore will be open to the public, but getting a seat may require planning and patience. The Court of the Judiciary ruled Wednesday that the November 12th trial of Moore would be held in the courtroom of the Alabama Supreme Court in the Alabama Judicial Building. Lawyers for Moore had asked that the trial be moved to a larger venue, like the Davis Theater in downtown Montgomery. The court ruling said moving the trial would be too expensive and would present security problems.

Court Members Refuse to Stepdown from Moore Case
Five members of the Alabama Court of the Judiciary have refused to disqualify themselves from hearing the judicial ethics case against suspended Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore. The court also denied a motion by Moore that the charges against him be dismissed and refused to reconsider an earlier decision to deny a motion asking that The court also ruled that the two lay members, McInnish and Jones, could wear judicial robes and sit behind plaques labeling them as judges. One of Moore’s attorneys, Jim Wilson of Montgomery, said Moore may appeal the court’s rulings to the Alabama Supreme Court. Another member of Moore’s legal team, former Supreme Court Justice Terry Butts, commented on the court members refusing to disqualify themselves. “Never have I seen an unelected court so hell bent on appearing biased and prejudiced in their erroneous rulings against Chief Justice Roy Moore,” Butts said.

Pryor Fights Moore’s Latest Attempt
to Remove Him From Ethics Case

The Judicial Inquiry Commission said Monday that a court should stick with its decision not to remove Attorney General Bill Pryor from the prosecution of suspended Chief Justice Roy Moore on judicial ethics charges. Moore, who faces ethics charges for refusing to comply with a federal judge’s order to remove a Ten Commandments monument from the rotunda of the state judicial building, had asked the Court of the Judiciary to take Pryor off the case. Moore said Pryor has legal conflicts that should prevent him from prosecuting Moore on the ethics charges.

Chief Justice Roy Moore Is Featured Speaker
At Annual Event In Pensacola, Florida

Alabama Chief Justice Roy S. Moore will be the featured speaker during the 10th Annual God and Country Day celebration at the Crossroad Baptist Church in Pensacola, Florida, Sunday, November 2, at 10:00 am CST. The church is located at 6800 Mobile Highway.

Minister To Launch Drive To Impeach Federal Judge
MONTGOMERY, Ala. — The Rev. Frank Raddish, leader of Washington, D.C.-based Capitol Hill Independent Baptist Ministries, said he’s coming to Montgomery to launch a petition to get Congress to remove U.S. District Court Judge Myron Thompson from the federal bench. “Those petitions will go to their U.S. congressmen in Alabama and U.S. senators, and that petition will ask those men that we have elected to investigate judge Myron Thompson and to impeach and remove him from office,” Raddish said.

Group Wants Federal Judge Ousted
The Rev. Frank Raddish, leader of Capitol Hill Independent Baptist Ministries, based in Washington, said he’s coming to Montgomery to launch a petition to remove U.S. District Court Judge Myron Thompson from the bench by Congress. “There have been other judges who have exceeded their bounds before, and they have gone unopposed. The battle line has been drawn,” Raddish said. “We are not going to stand around any longer and watch federal judges destroy the true meaning of the United States Constitution and the Bill of Rights.”

Ala. Justice Brings Message to Florida
FORT LAUDERDALE – Alabama chief justice Roy Moore, who sought to prevent the removal of a Ten Commandments monument from a court lobby was here Saturday to repeat his message that the nation is being separated from God. “We’re moving from separation of church and state to separation of the people from God,” said Moore. Moore’s message was well-received by participants from 33 states at the ninth annual gathering. The conference included speeches, seminars and workshops on abortion, pornography, homosexuality, religious civil rights and grass-roots lobbying.

Fob James Weighs in with Moore on Ten Commandments
Montgomery — Former Governor Fob James has come to the defense of suspended Chief Justice Roy Moore. In 1997, James said he would use state troopers and the National Guard to defend Moore’s display of the Ten Commandments in an Etowah County courtroom. Moore’s attorneys filed papers yesterday (Thursday) in which James supports a second attempt by Moore to have Attorney General Bill Pryor barred from prosecuting the judge on judicial ethics charges. Pryor says he will file a motion to dismiss Moore’s latest filing, saying much of the material is false and irrelevant.

Ten Commandments May Have Move in Store
OCALA — The Ten Commandment monument is off the steps of the Alabama Supreme Court building, but may find a new station at the U.S. Capitol in Washington. U.S. Rep. Cliff Stearns, R-Ocala, introduced a congressional resolution Wednesday which would require the appropriate display of the Ten Commandments in the U.S. Capitol.

Ala. Chief Justice Fights Charges, Wants Court Members Disqualified
MONTGOMERY, Ala. — Alabama’s chief justice has asked that five of the nine members of the Court of the Judiciary be disqualified from hearing the ethics case that could lead to his removal from office. Roy Moore’s attorneys asked that the five step down for various reasons including that two members have served longer than their appointments and that other members discussed Moore’s case with state court employees. The court did not immediately rule on the motion.

Court Rejects Moore’s Call for Pryor to Step Down
MONTGOMERY, Ala. — The Court of the Judiciary on Wednesday rejected suspended Chief Justice Roy Moore’s bid to remove Attorney General Bill Pryor from the judicial ethics case that could lead to Moore’s removal from office. The court issued a one-sentence ruling saying only that the motion was denied. Moore had argued that Pryor has legal conflicts and should not be allowed to prosecute him for refusing a federal judge’s order to remove a Ten Commandments monument from the state judicial building’s rotunda.

Moore Asks for Pryor to Step Down
MONTGOMERY, Ala. – Attorneys for Chief Justice Roy Moore filed a motion Monday asking that Attorney General Bill Pryor not be allowed to serve as prosecutor in the judicial ethics case that could remove Moore from office. The motion filed with the Court of the Judiciary said Pryor has legal conflicts and should not be allowed to prosecute Moore for disobeying a federal judge’s order to remove a Ten Commandments monument from the rotunda of the Alabama Judiciary Building. The motion cites 14 reasons why Pryor should be disqualified.

Judge talks about God, monument
If Roy Moore hadn’t pursued law for his career, maybe he could have been a minister instead. Moore, Alabama’s suspended chief justice, had many in a crowd of about 150 people at Lexington’s Willow Ridge Church yelling “Amen!” and “Preach it!” Monday afternoon. The enthusiastic response was for Moore’s spirited discussion of why he defied a judge’s order in August to remove a monument of the Ten Commandments he had placed in the rotunda of the Alabama Supreme Court building.

Justice Moore to Visit Barrow County
Alabama Supreme Court chief justice Roy Moore is scheduled to meet with the Barrow County Commission Nov. 6 to discuss the county’s battle against an American Civil Liberties Union lawsuit to remove a Ten Commandments display from the courthouse. The Rev. Jody Hice and Tennessee consultant Charlie Wysong of Ten Commandments Georgia Inc. and THOUSHALT.org., organizations dedicated to raising money to fight the ACLU lawsuit, invited Moore after he and Hice made a recent joint television appearance, the county said.

Judges Refuses Questioning Panel by Moore Attorneys
The panel that will consider judicial ethics charges against Chief Justice Roy Moore again refused to answer his questions about possible bias. Writing for the nine-member Alabama Court of the Judiciary, Chief Judge William C. Thompson issued an order Wednesday saying rules do not allow questioning of members of the panel.

Moore’s Lawyers Ask To Question Judges
Attorneys for Chief Justice Roy Moore asked Alabama’s Court of the Judiciary on Tuesday for permission to question and possibly disqualify its members in the judicial ethics case against him — a prospect the judges balked at less than a month ago.

If Religious Liberty Is To Survive, America’s Pulpits Must Awaken!
Can you imagine what our Founding Fathers would have done to some would-be tyrant of a federal judge who would have attempted to force a state Supreme Court chief justice to remove a display of the Ten Commandments from his court building? I dare say such a one would have been tarred, feathered, and run out of town on a rail.

Moore To Speak At Local Church
Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore is scheduled to speak Nov. 2 at Crossroad Baptist Church’s 10th annual God and Country Day. “I know it’s hard for modern America to understand, but Judge Moore is a man of unflinching courage and commitment,” said Chuck Baldwin, pastor of Crossroad Baptist Church and a keynote speaker at an August rally at the judicial building to support Moore and the inclusion of the Ten Commandments. “He’s been one of my heroes for a long time.”

Bills to Stop Courts from ‘Prohibiting the Free Exercise Thereof’
WASHINGTON — Members of Congress are sponsoring legislation to prevent the federal judiciary from blocking government acknowledgments of God. Rep. Chip Pickering, R.-Miss., and Sen. Wayne Allard, R.-Colo., have introduced bills to clarify that displays of the Ten Commandments and other acknowledgments of God are among the powers reserved to the states. Their legislation also would exempt such acknowledgments from the jurisdiction of federal courts below the Supreme Court.

Anti-Ten Commandments Lawyers Lose Pay Bid
A federal appeals court yesterday rejected a $76,109 bill from advocacy-group lawyers who successfully argued for the removal of the Ten Commandments display from Alabama’s Supreme Court. The 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals panel praised the “excellent job” by lawyers from Americans United for Separation of Church and State and the Southern Poverty Law Center, but said the team’s lead lawyer, Ayesha N. Kahn, was far too expert to justify so much time preparing the appeal.

Religious Rights Groups Rally As Court Begins New Session
WASHINGTON – As about 200 protestors rallied outside the Supreme Court demanding government support for religious displays, inside the justices began their annual term with at least one major church-state case on the docket. The protesters displayed a replica of the Ten Commandments monument recently removed from the Alabama judicial building in Montgomery.

Moore Backers Swamp Judges
BIRMINGHAM — Judges who will decide the fate of suspended Chief Justice Roy Moore in his ethics case are being swamped with calls and letters from his supporters, some of whom have prompted security worries. In one letter to a member of the Court of the Judiciary, a writer praised Moore’s stand for the display of the Ten Commandments and quoted the Bible in an apparent warning for his opponents. “Vengeance is mine, saith the Lord,” the letter stated.

10 Commandments Showdown Continues to Intensify
American Vision in conjunction with other ministries and churches is going to work in Georgia to prepare for what could be a major constitutional showdown over the Ten Commandments display. A similar crisis recently took place in Montgomery, Alabama, when Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore refused to move a Ten Commandments monument from his court house.

Plaintiffs Decline to Respond to Moore’s Supreme Court Filing
Attorneys for plaintiffs who sued to have the Ten Commandments monument removed from the rotunda of the Alabama Judiciary Building say they will not file a response to suspended Chief Justice Roy Moore’s request for the Supreme Court to hear the case. Moore filed a 31-page brief last month with the Supreme Court saying the court needs to issue a definitive ruling on the issue of religious displays in public places.

Judge Roy Moore: It’s Time For Christians To Take A Stand
Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy S. Moore said Monday night that the Ten Commandments controversy he is embroiled in is not the ego trip some have claimed. “This is not about the Ten Commandments, it’s not about me, or even about religion. It’s about whether or not the state can acknowledge God,” he said. “And the time has come for Christians to stand up and be the salt and light God has made us to be.”

380,000 Show Support for Commandments
Hundreds of people from across the country gathered Monday in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington to support the public display of the Ten Commandments — another sign that the movement to end judicial tyranny continues to pick up steam. The “Spirit of Montgomery” caravan, named for the Alabama capital city where Chief Justice Roy Moore refused to obey a federal judge’s order to remove a Commandments monument, traveled 10 days through five states before arriving at the Supreme Court.

Caravan Camps on Court House Steps
The Save the Commandments Caravan, a mobile protest against judicial tyranny and the loss of religious liberty in America, has wrapped up its journey to Washington, DC, with a rally at the U.S. Supreme Court. Under the watchful eye of Supreme Court marshals, thousands of Christians rallied on the steps of the Supreme Court building Monday to urge the unrestricted public display of the Ten Commandments and to voice anger over the loss of freedom to acknowledge God and celebrate America’s religious heritage on public property.

Over 700 Christians Rally Outside Supreme Court
Washington – More than 700 people rallied outside the Supreme Court yesterday, calling on the Justices to tap into Christian faith when making decisions and demanding that Congress post the Ten Commandments inside the Capitol. Four Christian groups sponsored the rally, ending a 10-day, five-state tour in which religious leaders displayed a replica of the Ten Commandments monument that was removed from the Alabama Judicial Building.

Christians Arrested
WASHINGTON — Hundreds of supporters of an Alabama judge who refused to remove a monument of the Ten Commandments from his courthouse demonstrated Sunday, hoping to persuade the Supreme Court to allow the display of the religious symbol. Several organizers, including the Rev. Pat Mahoney of the Christian Defense Coalition, were arrested by U.S. marshals for crossing a police line outside St. Matthew’s Cathedral, where an annual Mass to request spiritual guidance for the legal profession was being celebrated.

Ten Commandments Caravan in D.C.
The “Save the Commandments Caravan” is making its case before the U.S Supreme Court. The group will hold a prayer rally in front of the high court to protest court decisions that have blocked public displays of the Ten Commandments. The “caravan” was prompted, in part, by the Suspension of Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore. He refused to remove a monument to the Ten Commandments from the state judicial building.

Commandments Caravan Heading for Washington
If you thought the demonstrations surrounding Alabama’s controversial Ten Commandments monument were over, think again. Now that the courts have ordered it removed from the state judicial building, supporters of suspended Chief Justice Roy Moore are taking their fight to the nation’s capitol. It’s called the Save the Commandments Caravan.

’10 Commandments Revolution’ Launched
Motivated by what he views as an assault on free speech by the ACLU, a Georgia man has launched a campaign to distribute thousands of Ten Commandments signs across the nation. Robert Frey, a 33-year-old “average guy who’s fed up and wants to do something,” has set a goal of selling 100,000 signs, suitable for front yards, through a website, TheRevolutionWillBeLive.com.

Case Reveals Ultimate Constitutional Problems
The Alabama Ten Commandments case illustrates well how our federal judiciary has come to play an increasingly undemocratic role in what, at least on paper, is supposed to be a free country. In truth, the judicial branch has always been insulated from political pressure, as the founding fathers intended it to be. The difficulty has arisen in the past 50 years, with the ever-increasing willingness of the federal courts to wade into questions that are not, in fact, legal, but rather political ones.

Reno: Removal Of Ten Commandments Display In Alabama Proper
The removal of a Ten Commandments monument from Alabama’s state judicial building rotunda was proper because the display promoted religion and did not illustrate the history of the law, former U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno said.

Money Raised Will Go To Moore’s Defense, Not Institute
The group raising money to pay legal bills for Suspended Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore said it won’t use any of the donations to construct a planned institute in Etowah County honoring the judge. Mel Glenn, executive director of the Birmingham-based Foundation for Moral Law, said money being raised to pay lawyers representing Moore in his fight over the Ten Commandments monument.

Chief Justice Offers Monument to Congress
Seeking to move the battle over religion in government to a national stage, Chief Justice Roy Moore on Tuesday offered his Ten Commandments monument to Congress for display in the U.S. Capitol. The offer came nearly three weeks after the 5,300-pound granite monument was removed from the rotunda of the state judicial building to comply with a federal judge’s order. Moore refused to follow the order, but Alabama’s eight associate justices overruled him.

Moore Taking Commandments Fight Nationwide
Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore took his fight for the Ten Commandments to Texas this weekend, saying he intends to take the campaign nationwide. Moore, who appeared in Atlanta two weekends ago, spoke at a meeting of Houston-area preachers today, a day after he addressed thousands of worshippers at two different Texas churches. Offerings were taken up to support Moore.

Judge Roy Moore and the Defining Moment
There has been quite a bit of talk about civil disobedience in this case. Judge Roy Moore, however, stated correctly, “This is not about civil disobedience.” This case is about biblical obedience, plain and simple. The quintessential bible verse for guidance on the parameters of civil government is found in Romans 13. However, I believe many Christian leaders are incorrectly using Romans 13 to say that Judge Moore is wrong to defy the order of Judge Myron Thompson.

Unprecedented Number of Pastors Organize
for Continued Ten Commandments Battle

Ninety-five clergy representing 72 churches in the greater Montgomery area and others from throughout Alabama met to organize for follow-up events surrounding the defense of the continued display of the Ten Commandments in the Alabama Judicial Building. Local leaders said that the unexpectedly large number of participants indicates a growing momentum for the movement now being called the Spirit of Montgomery.

The Media Won’t Tell You: It A’int Over In Montgomery
All of a sudden, the “news” media doesn’t deal with the Ten Commandments situation in Montgomery, Alabama anymore. One report (from a man who was there) stated that on 8/31 there were people in Montgomery from all over the United States, England, and other countries as well.

Moore Opposes Commandments Plan
Judge Roy Moore said he disapproves of a proposal to display a plaque of the Ten Commandments at the Capitol that would surround it with other historic and secular foundations of law.

Federal judge Myron Thompson Tosses Suit
A federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit seeking to return a 53-hundred pound Ten Commandments monument to the lobby of the Alabama Judicial building. The lawsuit was filed by three Alabama residents who claimed that moving the monument, state court officials unconstitutionally established the religion of nontheistic beliefs. U-S District Judge Myron Thompson ruled Thursday that the removal of the monument, which he had ordered, did not violate the Constitution.

Showdown in Montgomery: In Defense of God’s Law
What Happens Now? The fight is not over. Chief Justice Moore has filed a writ of certiorari to have his case heard by the Supreme Court. They have only refused to hear arguments on the motion to stay the removal of the monument. There is a conflict in federal circuits right now. In the Third Circuit, they have ruled that the Ten Commandments displayed in the courthouse is constitutional (Chester, PA). In the Eleventh Circuit, they have ruled it unconstitutional. The Supreme Court will have to accept a case like this sooner or later to resolve the conflicts.

Monument Demonstrators Issue Call to Local Leaders
The fight to return the Ten Commandments monument to the judicial building’s rotunda continues, but there’s a new focus. Organizers of the demonstrations are putting pressure on local leaders to take up the cause. Sandy Rios from Washington says, “It’s important that people show up and come from all across the country. And show this is not an issue that’s going to go by easy. I don’t think this is dead at all.”

Missing Display Doesn’t Stop Protesters
They gathered by the hundreds in sweltering heat Thursday. They stood in the pouring rain the day before. But many said they were there because they supported the Ten Commandments monument, they backed Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore — who has been suspended for refusing to move it as a federal judge ordered — and the people say they also were there to stand up for God.

The Ten Commandments Controversy
When was the last time you actually heard a sermon preached at your local church on idolatry, keeping the Sabbath day holy, using the Lord’s name in vain, honoring your parents, murder, lying, stealing, adultery or covetousness? Could the Lord be sending us another warning for our consideration? When a majority of pastors and preachers won’t even acknowledge the Ten Commandments from the pulpit? Are they posted anywhere in your church or do you even know?

Dobson Says Ten Commandments Ruling
Comes From ‘Imperialistic Judiciary’

Christian radio host James Dobson said federal judges are “determined to shove their beliefs down our throats” by removing a Ten Commandments monument from the state judicial building’s rotunda. The internationally syndicated talk show host joined more than a thousand supporters of suspended Chief Justice Roy Moore on Thursday to pray and rally for the return of the justice’s monument. Dobson said the fight is about “an unelected, non-accountable, arrogant, imperialistic judiciary determined to shove their beliefs down our throats.”

N.C. County Officials Offer To Store Monument
Gaston County commissioners say the 2-ton granite monument of the Ten Commandments removed from Alabama’s Supreme Court this week would be a welcome addition to the their county courthouse. A unanimous commission voted Thursday to ask if the county could store the monument while the national controversy it has stirred over the separation of church and state plays itself out in federal court.

Justice Moore Says Fight Goes On
Invoking the name of Patrick Henry, Judge Roy Moore told gathered supporters Monday that Christians are being offended by the actions of many of Alabama’s elected officials. To shouts of hallelujah, Moore said, “We should be offended when the elected representatives of this state, the governor, attorney general, and the justices of this court fail to acknowledge God as the basis of our justice system, simply because one federal judge says we can’t.” Moore also said that “Christians are offended at many things in today’s society – abortion, sodomy in our streets, kids getting killed in school.”

‘Freedom Of Religion’ Lawsuit Filed In Federal Court
Supporters of the Ten Commandments monument asked a federal court Monday to block its removal from the Alabama Judicial Building, where barricades were erected to keep crowds from pressing against the glass front entrance. The lawsuit, filed in federal court in Mobile on behalf of a Christian radio talk show host and a pastor, says the forced removal of the monument would violate the constitutional guarantee of freedom of religion.

Dr. James Dobson Endorses Civil Disobedience Over 10 Commandments
Dr. James Dobson of Focus on the Family, the most listened to religious radio show in the US, today interrupted his normal broadcast schedule to interview suspended Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore and former US Ambassador Alan Keyes as they called Americans to travel to Montgomery, Alabama, to join in a public stand to preserve the display of the Ten Commandments in the Alabama Supreme Court building.

Defenders Plan To Block Removal Of 10 Commandments
Defenders of the Ten Commandments monument in the Alabama Judicial Building are preparing to peacefully resist its anticipated removal this week. More than a hundred demonstrators gathered on the courthouse steps Sunday. They say they expect the 5,300 pound monument to be moved on Monday or Tuesday. The group plans to block the removal of the monument by blocking the doors of the building by kneeling and locking hands.

Alabama’s Chief Justice Suspended Over Ten Commandments Display
Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore was suspended today pending the outcome of an ethics complaint for his defiance of a federal court order to move a Ten Commandments monument from the state judicial building in Montgomery. Moore was automatically suspended with pay this afternoon when the nine-member Alabama Judicial Inquiry Commission referred the ethics complaint against Moore to the Court of the Judiciary. The Court of the Judiciary holds trial-like proceedings and can discipline and remove judges.

Plaintiffs will NOT Seek to Hold Chief Justice Roy Moore in Contempt of Court
Lawyers for plaintiffs seeking to remove a Ten Commandments monument from the Alabama Judicial Building told a federal judge today that they will NOT for now seek to have Chief Justice Roy Moore held in contempt of court of fines levied against the state for refusing to remove the monument. The attorneys told US District Judge Myron Thompson they’re convinced that the monument would be moved by next week. Thompson told attorneys he would schedule another conference call for late next week.

Showdown in Montgomery
The order by federal judge Myron Thompson for Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore to remove a display of the Ten Commandments from the Alabama Supreme Court building is the latest example of judicial tyranny by arrogant and despotic federal judges. If allowed to stand, the right of people, through their elected state representatives, to acknowledge God will be eviscerated. The significance and importance of this case is as monumental as the decisions in 1962 & ’63 when prayer and Bible reading were removed from schools and the Roe v Wade decision in 1973 which legalized abortion on demand. In other words, this case is huge!

Backers Guard Ten Commandments Monument
About 40 supporters of an Alabama judge’s Ten Commandments monument stood watch over it early Friday, hoping to keep anyone from removing it from the rotunda of the state judicial building. Moore’s supporters kept vigil Friday morning from their sleeping bags and bedrolls strewn across the rotunda floor. The Rev. Herman Henderson of Believers’ Tabernacle in Birmingham opted to nap on the concrete with his head resting on sheet music for the song, “I Shall Not Be Moved.” They remained quiet throughout the night, prompting police to retreat to their post across the street.

Chief Justice Vows Fight Will Go On
Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore vows that he will continue the fight over the Ten Commandments and the state of Alabama’s right to acknowledge God. He accused U.S. District Judge Myron Thompson of placing himself above God by ordering the removal of a monument inscribed with the Ten Commandments from the Judicial Building. Moore placed the monument there in 2001. The Chief Justice also voiced disappointment in the decision of his eight fellow justices on the Alabama Supreme Court to have the monument removed in compliance to a ‘federal’ court order.


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